Home care has a distinct place in the future of US healthcare

States are beginning to make key changes to increase families’ access to home care

The COVID-19 pandemic has increased people’s awareness of the US healthcare system’s dependence on institutional care, and the potential dangers that come with a reliance on congregate healthcare settings. Nursing homes and hospital are a necessary part of the healthcare continuum, but COVID has undoubtedly increased the public’s appetite for—and governments’ understanding of—accessible home care.

90% of America’s seniors say that they prefer to age in place…

COVID may have a long-term effect on healthcare policy, as it has shifted the spotlight to the inherent benefits of home-based care. Home care is cost-effective: It costs governments, insurance companies, and individual families less to provide care in the home than in a hospital or facility. It’s also patient preferred: 90% of America’s seniors say that they prefer to age in place, and families with medically-fragile children and adults know their loved ones do better when they are in their own home environments.

In general, across the US, funding for home care programs continues to lag behind funding for services delivered in facilities like hospitals and nursing homes.

Home care advocates—state and national home care associations, providers, home care employees, and clients & families—have been advocating for better funding and better policies for home care for years with mixed success. In general, across the US, funding for home care programs continues to lag behind funding for services delivered in facilities like hospitals and nursing homes. But in this first post-COVID budget season, advocates have seen successes!

We’ve moved the needle: Several states increased their Medicaid funding for home care programs. The New Jersey legislature increased funding for home care by $2 more per hour, and for skilled nursing home care by $10 more per hour. Additionally, Delaware increased funding for skilled in-home nursing by 15%, and Georgia, Indiana, Missouri, and Pennsylvania have increased funding for private duty nursing by 10% or more. Thank you to these states for recognizing the importance of home care.  Increased funding will help thousands of children, seniors, and adults with disabilities and medical complexities access the home care they’ve been struggling to access due to caregiver shortages that have plagued the nation.

Other states have increased funding for home care at smaller increments, including Minnesota and Vermont. While any increase is appreciated, there is still work to do in these states and many others: Increasing funding, and reviewing it regularly, is essential in ensuring that caregivers’ wages can remain competitive as costs of living continue to rise year by year. If home care funding is raised now, but then ignored for years to come, then families that need home care will be back to the same situation they were in pre-pandemic: Struggling to find the care they need to stay safe and healthy at home.

On behalf of the home care community, thank you to the many legislators and decision-makers who have supported home care this year!

Hearts for Home Care Brings Legislative and Public Awareness to over 43 Million Viewers

Hearts for Home Care has had a busy year, working to secure public and legislative awareness to home care challenges across the industry. Over the first half of 2021, the duo of Alisa Fox and Marissa Fogal has worked in conjunction with BAYADA’s Government Affairs office to urge legislators to recognize and address home care industry challenges through user-generated traditional media and social media coverage. Over the past three months, the Public Affairs team launched three state-wide media campaigns in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and North Carolina focusing on the lack of state funding for both Private Duty Nursing (PDN) and Personal Care Assistant (PCA) programs, securing media coverage in major outlets like The Inquirer, NJ.com, and Spectrum News—all of which have garnered a total of 43,452,500 views.

Through their dedicated Hearts for Home Care social media efforts—which were formally added in September of last year—the Public Affairs team has been able to increase their audience reach to an additional 114,400 people over the three state-wide media campaigns, and these efforts only continue to grow.

BAYADA Director and Hearts for Home Care’s Senior Ambassador Hakeem Gaines speaking to reporters about the workforce shortage and retention issues with North Carolina’s Private Duty Nursing (PDN) program.

BAYADA’s Public Affairs team, in conjunction with the Government Affairs office, continues to advocate for medically fragile individuals and bring legislative action to the issues these populations face. To stay informed on important home care industry news and media updates, please follow Hearts for Home Care Advocacy on Facebook and Twitter!

Better Speech and Hearing Month: Using Communication Devices to Advocate

May is Better Speech and Hearing month and we would like to celebrate how our Hearts for Home Care advocates, Mark Steidl and Ari Anderson have never let their diagnoses stand in the way of making their voices heard. They are an inspiration to so many of their peers and fellow advocates ─ stopping at nothing to help and improve the lives of medically complex individuals who rely on home care to keep them cared for and safe.

Mark Steidl, from Pittsburgh, PA, doesn’t let communication challenges stop him from sharing his story with legislators. Diagnosed with Cerebral Palsy, he uses a Dynavox communication device to educate lawmakers on the importance of home care and the impact his home health aides and nurses have had on him. Mark operates the device by using the switches that are affixed to his wheelchair at either side of his head. The Dynavox allows Mark to type out what he wants to say, and then the device’s speakers enable Mark to communicate out loud.

Pictured: Disability rights advocate Mark Steidl (center) joins the Pennsylvania Homecare Association’s Advocacy Day in Harrisburg to tell legislators about what home care means to him. He is pictured here with BAYADA Home Health Care Hearts for Home Care Ambassador Kimberly Gardner (left) and CEO David Baiada (right).

Mark and his mother travel to the state capitol in Harrisburg, and to Washington, D.C. at least once a year to take part in Hearts for Home Care lobby days — days in which dozens of advocates gather to make meetings with legislators that will be voting on home care-specific legislation.

In a conversation with Mark about his advocacy work, he said, “Thirty years ago – before the advent of electronic communication devices, I would not have been able to communicate with you. If I had been born in 1965 instead of 1995, my parents might have been told to send me to an institution instead of raising me at home with all the support I need. Times have really changed. Advocacy and new ways of thinking have created those changes. But much more needs to be done and much more can be done. We have to keep advocating for the changes and the opportunities we want.”

Ari Anderson, from Charlotte NC, truly understands the importance his home care nurses have had on his life, and because of this, dedicates his life to advocating for them and the other individuals who benefit from their care: My nurses have provided me with life-sustaining care,” he says. Most die from [Spinal muscular atrophy] SMA type 1 by age 2.Ari was diagnosed with SMA Type I at 6 months of age. 38 years later, thanks to his dedicated nurses, new technologies, and medical therapies he is living his life healthy and independently at home.

With the help of his communication device, Ari has become a passionate advocate, inspiring all who meet him. His team of highly skilled nurses has also enabled him to graduate from high school, receive his bachelor’s degree, and earn a master’s certificate in technical writing. He now authors a column for SMA News Today and dedicates much of his time to advocating for home care and educating the public on its value. Most recently, using his communication device and eye-gazing technology, Ari brilliantly crafted a video he uses to educate North Carolina legislators about the impact of home nursing.

For Ari, skilled home care nursing has long-been a lifeline that has allowed him to grow up and thrive despite his prognosis. Most importantly, it has enabled him to be where he wants to be: at home.

Both Mark and Ari rely on skilled in-home caregivers to remain safe and cared for surrounded by their families at home. Like Mark says, the American healthcare system has changed and high-quality care at home is becoming the new norm as families and their loved ones choose home care over long-term care and nursing facilities. Lower costs of care and preventable hospitalizations are just two of the many reasons that home nursing care is optimal for the state and its residents.

However, skilled home nursing programs are state funded by Medicaid and the reimbursement rates given to providers are not enough to keep up with the competitive wages hospitals and long-term care facilities are able to offer. Without competitive wages, providers are struggling to attract qualified nurses to the industry, thus leaving medically complex individuals like Mark and Ari at risk without care. Our advocates are urging state legislators to invest in home care and raise reimbursement rates ─ as the future of our healthcare system is in the home.

Mark and Ari are super-advocates who are inspiring those around them to make their voices heard.  For ways you can advocate for yourself, your loved ones, and your community at-large, please email advocacy@bayada.com

GAO PA: 2% Increase to Pennsylvania’s ACSP Practice to Help Vulnerable Residents Access Care

HHAs Antwain and Markeeta Lewis were featured in the Pittsburgh Post Gazette to bring public and legislative awareness to low PA PAS rates

Throughout 2019 GAO, Pennsylvania office & field employees, clients, and industry partners banded together to secure a 2% increase for Personal Assistant Services (PAS) under Pennsylvania’s Office of Long-Term Living (OLTL), effective as of January 1, 2020.  This increase will result in an additional $700,000 in annualized revenue, as well as an additional $625,000 in operating surplus and will predominantly affect our Assistive Care State Programs (ACSP) offices.

In addition to increased revenue for Pennsylvania’s ACSP offices, this rate hike will also benefit the state’s most medically fragile and vulnerable adults and seniors. GAO anticipates that service offices will be able to recruit and retain more home health aides and fill more shifts that are currently going uncovered. 

In addition to traditional lobbying and advocacy efforts, GAO and state ACSP service offices worked together on an aggressive public affairs campaign that resulted in several articles regarding BAYADA clients’ struggles with accessing care, and opinion pieces authored by Clinical Managers (CMs). This campaign further added pressure to the state legislature to begin to solve the access to care issue. In 2020, GAO is seeking to increase the PAS rate even more—an additional 8% to reach a 10% total increase over 2018’s reimbursement rate for PAS services.

Advocate Spotlight: Mark Steidl acts as a voice for those without one–through his Dynavox communication device

Relying on a communication device to speak does not stop Mark from being a fierce advocate for disability rights and for the many individuals across the US that, like him, rely on in-home caregivers.

Pictured: Disability rights advocate Mark Steidl (center) joins the Pennsylvania Homecare Association's Advocacy Day in Harrisburg to tell legislators about what home care means to him. He is pictured here with BAYADA Home Health Care Associate Kimberly Gardner (left) and CEO David Baiada (right).
Pictured: Disability rights advocate Mark Steidl (center) joins the Pennsylvania Homecare Association’s Advocacy Day in Harrisburg to tell legislators about what home care means to him. He is pictured here with BAYADA Home Health Care Associate Kimberly Gardner (left) and CEO David Baiada (right).

 

On May 22, Mark Steidl and his mother Tina joined hundreds of Hearts for Home Care advocates in Harrisburg, PA to express to legislators the importance of home care and of its impact on the thousands of Pennsylvanians that are able to remain safely at home with their families due to in-home services.

Harrisburg isn’t Mark’s first time joining with others to advocate for better policies. In addition to his participation in the Pennsylvania Homecare Association’s (PHA) Advocacy Day, Mark currently actively advocates on behalf of the National Council on Independent Living and the United Way of Southwestern Pennsylvania’s “21 and Able project.

Not only is Mark an advocate, but his goal is to complete his Associate’s Degree in Social Work coursework, go on to obtain his bachelor’s degree, and eventually serve in a case management position so that he can continue to help others with disabilities. Mark, who is 23 and diagnosed with Cerebral Palsy, uses a Dynavox to communicate. Mark operates the device by using the switches that are affixed to his wheelchair at either side of his head. The Dynavox allows Mark to type out what he wants to say, and then the device’s speakers enable Mark to communicate out loud.

During their time in the state capitol, Mark and his mother met with Senator Jay Costa, Representative Paul Costa, and Representative Ed Gainey, who represents Mark’s district in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives. To prepare for the day, Mark used his Dynavox to create a message that he would share with each legislator. Mark found it important to not only advocate for himself, but for his caregivers. In addition to advocating for three key issues that PHA outlined as legislative priorities for the home care industry in Pennsylvania, Mark’s speech included the following:

At home and in the community, I have personal care assistants who help me with various physical things. These assistants are very important to me, as they are to any person who needs one-on-one help, whether people with disability or older people. These aides enable us to live at home and avoid having to go to nursing homes.

“I am advocating today on behalf of home care providers who make it possible for us to have high-quality homecare services… When I think of my priorities as an individual with a disability, my first priority is my health and how it affects my life. But helping people maintain good health should also a priority for society.

I am pleased to be here today because you make decisions that affect people with disabilities and older adults. You have the power to create positive change and to enable people to live good lives!”

When Hearts for Home Care asked Mark to tell us why he advocates, Mark used his Dynavox to tell us:

“I consider myself an advocate for myself and for other people with disabilities. My disability is visible, and many people are likely to underestimate me and not see the person that I am. I have to challenge society’s perception each and every day.

I have to tell people when I first meet them why I use a wheelchair and communication device to talk. I have to explain cerebral palsy. People often wonder how I do school work without the use of my hands, so I have to explain that also.

All of us with disabilities have abilities and accomplishments, but we have to advocate for ourselves in order to create our place in the world.

The efforts of many dynamic leaders, innovators and activists affect our lives every day. The things I do every day would have been impossible 30 or 40 years ago. Before the changes in education laws that occurred in the 1970s, I would have been considered too disabled to attend public school, let alone Community College of Allegheny County. Thirty years ago – before the advent of electronic communication devices, I would not have been able to communicate with you. If I had been born in 1965 instead of 1995, my parents might have been told to send me to an institution instead of raising me at home with all the support I need. Times have really changed. Advocacy and new ways of thinking have created those changes.

But much more needs to be done and much more can be done. We have to keep advocating for the changes and the opportunities we want.”

Mark is an inspiration to many of his peers, and to many who understand the importance of sharing their voice on behalf of others. For ways you can advocate for yourself, your loved ones, and your community at-large, please email advocacy@bayada.com