Pennsylvania Home Care Recipients Advocate for Better Access to Home Care

 Pennsylvania ranks seventh in the nation for the percent of its population that is 65 years of age or older1. As Baby Boomers continue to age and the population of older adults needing long-term care increases, the need for caregivers will continue to increase as well. Since COVID shined a light on major drawbacks of congregate living facilities like nursing homes and institutions, it is not just the elderly population that are choosing to be cared for at home. This is great news for the hundreds of thousands of individuals and families who prefer to age at home rather than in a facility. However, it also poses a major problem: there aren’t enough caregivers to take care of the current Pennsylvania population at home let alone the 29% growth that will occur by 2028, leaving a shortage of 73,000 home health aides2. This is due in large part to low state funding for Medicaid programs like Pennsylvania’s Personal Assistance Services (PAS) that cares for medically fragile individuals.

Stephen Hoppy from Luzerne County, PA with his home health aides

This is where our advocates come in. Home care recipients across the Commonwealth have banded together to help alleviate this growing caregiver shortage. Advocates like Stephen Hoppy from Luzerne County, PA are speaking out and helping raise awareness of the inadequate state funding. Stephen is approved for 20 hours per day of care from the PAS program, but since he cannot find enough caregivers to cover all those hours, he has been paying $500 per week out of his own pocket to help secure that coverage. Recently, Stephen was interviewed by FOX56 News about how the caregiver shortage has affected him.

“I am advocating because our healthcare system is compromised. There are plenty of people worse off than me that can’t get home care, which is unacceptable. These home health aides are medical professionals, and they need to be paid for their expertise and knowledge,” says Stephen.

COVID has only exacerbated this issue, with a mass exodus of health care workers no longer willing to risk their lives for a career that yields an average of only $12.40/hour. BAYADA Home Health Care has had to deny 40% of PAS cases in 2020 and 2021 because there were not enough caregivers to staff the cases. Teri Henning, the executive director of the Pennsylvania Homecare Association (PHA), says she’s hearing similar numbers from PAS providers across the board. “They simply cannot compete for the workforce,” she says. “Home health aides can earn more money doing similar work in other state home care programs, or in nursing homes, or even doing less physically- and emotionally-demanding work at Amazon, Target, or in fast food.”

“BAYADA Home Health Care has had to deny 40% of PAS cases in 2020 and 2021 because there were not enough caregivers to staff the cases.”

Pittsburgh resident, Maria Kolat with son Matthew

Home care advocate and mother, Maria, from Pittsburgh has also joined Hearts for Home Care’s advocacy efforts after experiencing these issues firsthand with her 22-year-old son, Matthew, who is developmentally disabled and requires non-stop supervision. Since COVID, their lives have dramatically changed—his schooling, his ability to receive psychological and medical care and—very significantly—his family’s ability to access the home health aide (HHA) care that Matthew needs and is qualified to receive. Maria and Matthew were featured on Pittsburgh’s local KDKA 2CBS station advocating on behalf of home health aides.

“Aides are leaving the caregiving field to work at big retail like Walmart and Amazon—or in fast food,” says Maria. “They can make $15 an hour or more there. When we see a revolving door of aides, Matthew can’t get the one-on-one care he needs, which puts him at risk.”

Home care advocates like Stephen and Maria give life to our advocacy efforts ─ their real-life experiences aren’t just numbers and statistics, but genuine struggles that thousands of Pennsylvanians endure every single day. They help tell the story so that legislators and influencers can fully grasp how their decisions are affecting their constituents and communities.

Home care advocates like Stephen and Maria give life to our advocacy efforts.

At the end of the day, when aides are not being drawn into working in home care, it’s Pennsylvania’s most vulnerable residents like Matthew and Stephen who suffer. PHA, home care providers, and advocates are asking the State to increase funding for the PAS program. Additional funding would put home care agencies in a better position to recruit and retain more HHAs, and thus ensure that PAS beneficiaries can continue to access the care they need to stay safe and healthy at home.

  1. https://www.leadingagepa.org/Portals/0/154869%20Long%20Term%20Care%20Statistics%20Book%20revised%20final.pdf page 14.
  2. https://mercer.healthcare-workforce.us/ +math

Advocacy Matters!

At Hearts for Home Care, we help those that care about home care by enabling you to get involved at the capacity in which you’re able to do so. Email us at advocacy@bayada.com or follow us on Facebook.com/Hearts4HomeCare in order to learn more about the home care advocacy community and find opportunities to get involved.

Home Care Has a Distinct Place in the Future of US Healthcare

States are beginning to make key changes to increase families’ access to home care

The COVID-19 pandemic has increased people’s awareness of the US healthcare system’s dependence on institutional care, and the potential dangers that come with a reliance on congregate healthcare settings. Nursing homes and hospital are a necessary part of the healthcare continuum, but COVID has undoubtedly increased the public’s appetite for—and governments’ understanding of—accessible home care.

90% of America’s seniors say that they prefer to age in place…

COVID may have a long-term effect on healthcare policy, as it has shifted the spotlight to the inherent benefits of home-based care. Home care is cost-effective: It costs governments, insurance companies, and individual families less to provide care in the home than in a hospital or facility. It’s also patient preferred: 90% of America’s seniors say that they prefer to age in place, and families with medically-fragile children and adults know their loved ones do better when they are in their own home environments.

In general, across the US, funding for home care programs continues to lag behind funding for services delivered in facilities like hospitals and nursing homes.

Home care advocates—state and national home care associations, providers, home care employees, and clients & families—have been advocating for better funding and better policies for home care for years with mixed success. In general, across the US, funding for home care programs continues to lag behind funding for services delivered in facilities like hospitals and nursing homes. But in this first post-COVID budget season, advocates have seen successes!

We’ve moved the needle: Several states increased their Medicaid funding for home care programs. The New Jersey legislature increased funding for home care by $2 more per hour, and for skilled nursing home care by $10 more per hour. Additionally, Delaware increased funding for skilled in-home nursing by 15%, and Georgia, Indiana, Missouri, and Pennsylvania have increased funding for private duty nursing by 10% or more. Thank you to these states for recognizing the importance of home care.  Increased funding will help thousands of children, seniors, and adults with disabilities and medical complexities access the home care they’ve been struggling to access due to caregiver shortages that have plagued the nation.

Other states have increased funding for home care at smaller increments, including Minnesota and Vermont. While any increase is appreciated, there is still work to do in these states and many others: Increasing funding, and reviewing it regularly, is essential in ensuring that caregivers’ wages can remain competitive as costs of living continue to rise year by year. If home care funding is raised now, but then ignored for years to come, then families that need home care will be back to the same situation they were in pre-pandemic: Struggling to find the care they need to stay safe and healthy at home.

On behalf of the home care community, thank you to the many legislators and decision-makers who have supported home care this year!

Public Affairs: BAYADA’s First Full Year of Full Time Public Affairs Efforts Secures Media Attention and Contributes to Legislative Wins!

BAYADA’s public affairs program has generated public and legislative awareness about home care, its importance in communities across the country, and the issues clients and families face accessing care due to low state reimbursement rates.

BAYADA has used public affairs efforts throughout the past several years. That is—in states where GAO and state leadership knew that increased public awareness and engagement would reinforce a strong lobbying message, GAO deployed these efforts, which resulted in increased legislative & regulatory pressure on BAYADA’s key issues. This was particularly true where BAYADA, home care recipients, and the industry needed rate increases to stay sustainable and to be able to recruit and retain enough caregivers to meet clients’ demand.

2019 was the first year that BAYADA invested in a full-time public affairs program. Here, public affairs staff executed several state-specific campaigns to further BAYADA’s legislative agenda, as well as an “umbrella” campaign to highlight the challenges seen regularly on the national home care and home health care front.

GAO enlisted public affairs firm Regan Communications Group (RCG) full-time to put clients’ and caregivers’ stories in the spotlight. No easy task, especially as media and newsworthy issues tend to change minute-by-minute, RCG regularly delivers by getting GAO’s legislative message out via broadcast, print, and non-traditional media outlets. As a result of full-time public affairs efforts in 2019, state governments heard us loud and clear, and often made policy changes in order to help alleviate the issues BAYADA staff, clients, and families faced.

Below, see a list of media that BAYADA’s GAO was able to gain through its partnership with RCG in 2019:

Federal/Industry-Wide

Home Health Care News: Immigration Reform, Minimum Wage Increases Top of Mind for BAYADA

Home Health Care News: Medicaid legislation introduced in Congress

STAT News: Health aides’ low wages threaten home health care, a necessity for millions

Modern Healthcare: More middle-income seniors face financial insecurity

Home Health Care News: Industry Insiders: Don’t Overlook CMS’s Dual-Eligibles Directive

Home Health Care News: Immigration “Pathways” Vital to industry’s future

Home Health Care News: BAYADA Hits 1M Clients Served. Here’s Why Hitting 2M Will be More Difficult

Modern Healthcare: Nursing home staffing levels often fall below CMS expectations

Everyday Health: Demand on the Rise for Home Healthcare

Authority Magazine: The Future of Healthcare: “First and foremost, reprioritize long-term care into the home setting” with David Totaro of BAYADA Home Health Care

Delaware

Delaware Public Media: Advocates call on state lawmakers to raise Medicaid reimbursement rates

Delaware State News: BAYADA Pediatrics director awarded national honor for advocacy work

Indiana

RTV 6: Hoosier families want more resources for home health care

WTHR 13: Gasping for Care: Indiana families desperately seek care amid home nursing shortage

New Jersey

NJTV & NJ Spotlight: Shortage of Home Care Nurses on Horizon

My Central Jersey: NJ’s shortage of private duty nurses taking toll on families

NJ 101.5: A home health care nursing shortage is looming in NJ

NJ Star Ledger: Prefer to age at home in N.J.? It will soon be even harder | Editorial

Pennsylvania

Bucks County Courier Times: BAYADA Home Health Care’s Langhorne office recently nominated Melissa Husted, of Morrisville, and Winnie Gittens, of Philadelphia, for the Pennsylvania Home Care Association’s 2019 Direct Care Worker of the Year Award

PennLive/Patriot News: Advocates call on lawmakers to make home-based care services more accessible for seniors and disabled

Generocity: BAYADA transitions from for-profit to nonprofit to save its mission-driven culture

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: An old refrain: Better wages, conditions a must for direct care workforce

PennLive/Patriot News: An opportunity to do the right thing for vulnerable Pennsylvanians: Raise home health aides’ wages

WXPI & WPGH: Lack of home health care aides impacting local patients

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: Increase funding for home care providers

Pittsburgh Tribune Review: Donna Pierantoni: Home care crisis’ impact on disabled adults, seniors

Rhode Island

Valley Breeze: Aging Out: Local family says vulnerable son fell through state’s cracks

Valley Breeze: Family frustrated after near-miss on losing care hours

Providence Business News: Anxious R.I. families await decision on special medical coverage

South Carolina

Post & Courier Gazette: Lowcountry home health care experts speak on the need for more workers in the field

Summerville Journal: Helping Mason: Family of Police Officers with Sick Child Loses Home Nurse Right Before the Holidays, need to raise Medicaid Reimbursement Rates in SC for 2020

GAO PA: 2% Increase to Pennsylvania’s ACSP Practice to Help Vulnerable Residents Access Care

HHAs Antwain and Markeeta Lewis were featured in the Pittsburgh Post Gazette to bring public and legislative awareness to low PA PAS rates

Throughout 2019 GAO, Pennsylvania office & field employees, clients, and industry partners banded together to secure a 2% increase for Personal Assistant Services (PAS) under Pennsylvania’s Office of Long-Term Living (OLTL), effective as of January 1, 2020.  This increase will result in an additional $700,000 in annualized revenue, as well as an additional $625,000 in operating surplus and will predominantly affect our Assistive Care State Programs (ACSP) offices.

In addition to increased revenue for Pennsylvania’s ACSP offices, this rate hike will also benefit the state’s most medically fragile and vulnerable adults and seniors. GAO anticipates that service offices will be able to recruit and retain more home health aides and fill more shifts that are currently going uncovered. 

In addition to traditional lobbying and advocacy efforts, GAO and state ACSP service offices worked together on an aggressive public affairs campaign that resulted in several articles regarding BAYADA clients’ struggles with accessing care, and opinion pieces authored by Clinical Managers (CMs). This campaign further added pressure to the state legislature to begin to solve the access to care issue. In 2020, GAO is seeking to increase the PAS rate even more—an additional 8% to reach a 10% total increase over 2018’s reimbursement rate for PAS services.

Pennsylvania Homecare Association (PHA) Legislative Day Pictures

On April 9, more than 300 home care advocates—clients, families, caregivers, and employees—joined the Pennsylvania Homecare Association (PHA) at the state capitol in Harrisburg. Advocates met with hundreds of the state’s representatives and senators to deliver an important message: Home care is important to me, and it should be important to you too.

Check out pictures from the legislative reception, the kickoff rally, legislative day meetings, and the PHA press conference! Care about home care and want to share your voice? Check out heartsforhomecare.com or email advocacy@bayada.com to find out how you can get involved in advocacy today!

CLICK TO SEE PICTURES

PA Governor Tom Wolf Nominates New Secretary of Aging

Robert Torres will head the Department of Aging, replacing former secretary Teresa Osborne

As Pennsylvania begins another legislative session Governor Tom Wolf will be nominating cabinet members to serve as departmental leaders within his administration for the next four years. Robert Torres will be nominated as Secretary of the Department of Aging on to replace Teresa Osborne’s vacancy as she is nominated for the state’s civil service commission.

The Secretary of the Department of Aging is responsible for the administration of all aging programs in Pennsylvania, as well as to promote the protection for residents of the Commonwealth. This position is important to BAYADA as they oversee many of the waivers that we utilize for the large population of seniors that we serve in one of the top “graying” states in the country.

Robert Torres most recently served as the Secretary of the Commonwealth, a position he has held since 2017. Prior to that, Torres served in the State Department as Executive Deputy Secretary and as Deputy Secretary of Administration for the State Department of Health. In the private sector, Robert Torres was the Vice President of health information technology at Capital Blue Cross and at General Dynamics Information Technology.

Pennsylvania Government Affairs Director Laura Ness recently asked ambassadors to send welcome letters to the new Secretary of Aging. Join us in welcoming Robert Torres to this important position. GAO is excited to work with Secretary Torres and his team to help older adults living in Pennsylvania access the care they need.

Advocacy Win! Home Care Employee Christine Detweiler’s Advocacy Efforts Lead to New SMA Law

Christine’s advocacy efforts led to the ultimate win: a new law that will benefit families!

Rep. Marguerite Quinn’s home visit with a five-year old client with SMA led her to introduce a bill about newborn screening for the disease!
Rep. Marguerite Quinn’s home visit with a five-year old client with SMA led her to introduce a bill about newborn screening for the disease!

Pennsylvania Hearts for Home Care Ambassador Christine Detweiler has always been a diligent advocate, but recently, her efforts have proven that home care employees can truly go beyond the call of duty for clients and staff by serving as their voices in our state capitals.

“Home care is important to so many Pennsylvanians, and many aren’t as readily able to meet with legislators to share their stories,” said Christine. “I see advocacy as an extension of why I do what I do as a home care employee: We need to make sure we get out there to be a voice for those who don’t have one!”

Christine has been progressively adding more interactions to her advocacy portfolio—Over the past year-and-a-half she focused on meeting legislators in their district offices, and in the past few months she has hosted multiple home visits. Home visits are the most impactful way to demonstrate the importance of home care to legislators because it gives them a chance to see firsthand how clients receive services. To say Christine’s home visit resonated with Pennsylvania state Representative Marguerite Quinn is an understatement.

A few months ago, Christine led the representative on a home visit with five-year old client Gideon M. who suffers from Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA). His mother shared their heartwarming story and opened up about their family’s challenges and Gideon’s ever-growing needs. Her story impacted the representative so deeply that shortly after the visit, Rep. Quinn emailed Christine to further assess the family’s needs and determine how she could help them obtain a transportation cart that would make Gideon’s care easier. The outreach didn’t stop there.

Rep. Quinn recently reported to Christine that she has arranged for a builder to come into the family’s home to build custom doors to create a private area for Gideon downstairs. She also reported that she contacted a rotary to find out if the family can be provided with a generator so that they do not need to constantly worry about their home’s power going out. It is truly remarkable how Christine’s efforts have impacted her client and his care.

In addition to her efforts for Gideon’s family, Rep. Quinn introduced a bill that would add SMA screening to the newborn screening list to help diagnose this disease before a child is even born. After introducing this legislation, Rep. Quinn encouraged the state Newborn Screening Advisory Board to support the measure. As a result of her continued efforts, this past month Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine signed the recommendation.

The Hearts for Home Care Team can’t be prouder of the impact that Christine has made! Her passion and tenacity has reached the hearts of many legislators, and she is truly making a name for herself in Harrisburg as a tireless advocate!

A special thanks to Rep. Quinn for her work to get this law on the books on behalf of all of Pennsylvania’s future families. Click here to read the opinion piece that Gideon’s mom, Ruth M., authored, and The Intelligencer published!

To learn more about how your office can host a home visit, or ways you can get involved with advocacy on behalf of all home care staff and clients, email advocacy@bayada.com today.

Pictured: Christine Detweiler (left) poses with fellow home care advocates and state Representative Craig Staats during The Pennsylvania Home Care Association’s Advocacy Day
Pictured: Christine Detweiler (left) poses with fellow home care advocates and state Representative Craig Staats during The Pennsylvania Home Care Association’s Advocacy Day

Advocate Spotlight: Christine Detweiler is a Voice for Her Pediatric Client Gideon

From home visit to house bill: Christine’s advocacy efforts lead to a bill introduction!

Pictured: Christine Detweiler (left) poses with fellow home care advocates and state Representative Craig Staats during The Pennsylvania Home Care Association’s Advocacy Day
Pictured: Christine Detweiler (left) poses with fellow home care advocates and state Representative Craig Staats during The Pennsylvania Home Care Association’s Advocacy Day

Pennsylvania Hearts for Home Care Ambassador Christine Detweiler has always been a diligent advocate, but recently, her efforts have proven that home care employees can truly go beyond the call of duty for clients and staff by serving as their voices in our state capitals.

“Home care is important to so many Pennsylvanians, and many aren’t as readily able to meet with legislators to share their stories,” said Christine. “I see advocacy as an extension of why I do what I do as a home care employee: We need to make sure we get out there to be a voice for those who don’t have one!”

Christine has been progressively adding more interactions to her advocacy portfolio—Over the past year-and-a-half she focused on meeting legislators in their district offices, and in the past few months she has hosted multiple home visits. Home visits are the most impactful way to demonstrate the importance of home care to legislators because it gives them a chance to see firsthand how clients receive services. To say Christine’s home visit resonated with Pennsylvania state Representative Marguerite Quinn is an understatement.

A few months ago, Christine led the representative on a home visit with five-year old client Gideon M. who suffers from Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA). His mother shared their heartwarming story and opened up about their family’s challenges and Gideon’s ever-growing needs. Her story impacted the representative so deeply that shortly after the visit, Rep. Quinn emailed Christine to further assess the family’s needs and determine how she could help them obtain a transportation cart that would make Gideon’s care easier. The outreach didn’t stop there.

Rep. Quinn recently reported to Christine that she has arranged for a builder to come into the family’s home to build custom doors to create a private area for Gideon downstairs. She also reported that she contacted a rotary to find out if the family can be provided with a generator so that they do not need to constantly worry about their home’s power going out. It is truly remarkable how Christine’s efforts have impacted her client and his care.

In addition to her efforts for Gideon’s family, Rep. Quinn recently introduced a bill that would add SMA screening to the newborn screening list to help diagnose this disease before a child is even born. As of today, the Spinal Muscular Atrophy Bill (HB 2484) has been introduced and placed in the Health Committee for consideration. Representative Quinn reached out to her House colleagues and asked for co-sponsors for the important resolution and to bring awareness to this condition and to assist families across Pennsylvania with early intervention. We are looking forward to this bill passing through committee once legislators are back in Harrisburg.

The Hearts for Home Care Team can’t be prouder of the impact that Christine has made! Her passion and tenacity has reached the hearts of many legislators, and she is truly making a name for herself in Harrisburg as a tireless advocate!

To learn more about how your office can host a home visit, or ways you can get involved with advocacy on behalf of all home care staff and clients, email advocacy@bayada.com today.

Rep. Marguerite Quinn’s home visit with a five-year old client with SMA led her to introduce a bill about newborn screening for the disease!
Rep. Marguerite Quinn’s home visit with a five-year old client with SMA led her to introduce a bill about newborn screening for the disease!

Problems Emerge in Community HealthChoices in Southwest PA

A special guest article by the Pennsylvania Health Law Project (PHLP)

In January 2018, 11,000 older adults and people with disabilities in Southwest PA who had been receiving Medicaid long term services and supports in the community, started receiving those services, including personal assistance services (PAS), from one of three Community HealthChoices (CHC) managed care plans: UPMC Community HealthChoices, PA Health & Wellness, and AmeriHealth Caritas.

For the first six months of the roll-out, CHC participants were entitled to keep receiving the same amount of long term services and supports they had been receiving prior to CHC with the providers they had been using. This six-month “continuity of care period” in the Southwest ended on June 30.

PHLP has been hearing from CHC participants about actions CHC plans are taking to reduce services in this post-continuity of care period. After speaking with these participants and reviewing CHC plan notices and service plans, it appears CHC plans are violating the rights of participants and not following the terms of their agreement with the state.

The problems CHC participants are experiencing include deficient notices reducing services they had been receiving and a lack of appropriate person-centered service planning. Most of the problematic service reduction notices involve PAS.

Notices Sent to Participants Are Inadequate: CHC plans are sending reduction and denial notices to participants that do not include any explanation or reasons for why services are being reduced or why requests for new or increased services are not approved. CHC plans are required to send their members written notice of reductions and denials of services. These notices must detail the reasons for the change or denial. Justifications, which PHLP has documented, like “you have been assessed to need less PAS hours” or “the services are not medically necessary” without any further explanation are insufficient. The CHC participants who have contacted PHLP are receiving notices that do not explain why the CHC plan decided they do not need the services, what has changed to warrant a service reduction, or how requested services are not medically necessary.

Lack of Person Centered Planning: Person-centered service planning is at the core of CHC. It is supposed to be a process in which the CHC participant, working with their service coordinator and anyone else the participant wants involved, identifies her needs, preferences, and goals. This informs the development of a service plan. The person-centered service plan process is so central to the CHC program that home and community-based services, including PAS, received under continuity of care cannot be changed until the process is complete. Yet, PHLP has heard from participants who are being denied services when they have not gone through the service planning process. Others have gone through the process but have not been given a copy of the service plan that was developed. Still others have had incomplete service plans, such as unsigned plans or not having any goals listed at all.

PHLP has shared its concerns with the Department of Human Services (DHS)and will continue to do so as new examples of problems surface. DHS reacted swiftly to the information and specific examples PHLP provided.  All three CHC plans have been put in corrective action. As a result, the CHC plans are retraining service coordinators on person-centered planning and submitting to the state for review all notices issued to members when services are denied or reduced. DHS has assigned staff to review every service denial notice until it is satisfied that each CHC plan is complying with the CHC agreement. Moreover, DHS and staff from its Office of General Counsel are meeting in July with senior leadership from each CHC plan to review the minimum content required for a service denial notice when plans deny or reduce a CHC participant’s services.

However, regardless of he corrective actions described above, vigilance from CHC participants and their providers in the Southwest is needed to ensure the CHC program moves into its next phase in the region in a way that does not harm participants but assures their needs are met. CHC participants, their family members or other supports, and providers are encouraged to read notices denying or changing services carefully. These notices include information about how to file an appeal. CHC participants should appeal decisions if they do not agree with them. Appealing quickly will ensure they continue to receive services at the previously approved level while they go through the appeal process.

PHLP strongly encourages CHC participants or their providers or advocates to call the PHLP Helpline at 1-800-274-3258 or email us at staff@phlp.org for advice or help with their appeal. Information about appealing a CHC decision can also be found on PHLP’s website (www.phlp.org). You can also sign up here for the second part of PHLP’s CHC Appeals webinar series which will be held on July 17.

PA Budget Record: First Early Budget in Over Four Years!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the first time in over four years, the Pennsylvania General Assembly completed the FY 2018-2019 budget ahead of the constitutionally mandated June 30 deadline.

During our Advocacy Day in Harrisburg, House Appropriations Chairman Stan Saylor announced he was working to get us an increase in personal assistant services (PAS) provided under the Office of Long-Term Living. This was Pennsylvania’s primary legislative priority for BAYADA in 2018.

After this announcement the Government Affairs Office (GAO), home care advocates, and the Pennsylvania Homecare Association (PHA) worked at breakneck speeds to make it a reality. In the month leading up to the final budget we met with Chairman Saylor and staff several times, spoke with key leadership, and touched the entire legislature several times. Unfortunately, the legislature passed, and the Governor signed, the FY 2018-2019 budget without this increase.

We have been working towards this increase since 2014 and we have made incredible progress. We will continue to ensure this remains top of legislators’ minds. This summer we will begin our work to ensure we receive a rate increase in next year’s budget.

Thank you for your support, and for the time that you took participating in our efforts, whether it was by emailing legislators through our action alert, which generated over 430 emails to legislators, or through your attendance at PHA’s Advocacy Day in Harrisburg. All of these efforts showed legislators just how widespread and important this issue is, and we have heard directly from many who told us how impactful our efforts continue to be.