Medically Complex and Turning 21: Rhode Island Families Struggle to Access Home Care

Brandon Stone (center, seated) has been able to grow up at home among his parents and siblings due to home care nursing. Turning 21 has threatened his ability to continue with that care.

For most people, turning 21 is a milestone to celebrate. But the State of Rhode Island is putting undue pressure on medically complex Rhode Islanders who are turning 21. For those who receive home care services under Medicaid, such as the Katie Beckett waiver, their medical coverage changes on their 21st birthday, which affects who pays for their services, the types of services available to them, and their state-authorized hours and funding levels. Without proper planning and communication, these changes can result in uncertainly of continuity of care and access to home care services.

For young adults like Zach, Corinna, Brandon, and their families, turning 21 has been a source of significant stress and uncertainty rather than the celebration it deserves to be. Upon “aging out” of Medicaid, they have received word from the state that their care would be changing without much warning. Parents of medically complex individuals tend to be lifelong advocates on behalf of their children, and so all three have been able to retain their services on a month-to-month basis. “This is just a band-aid that covers the issue,” says BAYADA Home Health Care’s Government Affairs Director Ashley Sadlier. “Each month, they don’t know whether that band-aid will stay on or get ripped off. Everyone deserves to stay at home if it’s their wish to do so, and it’s arbitrary that a birthday is basically a penalization in Rhode Island.”

The interesting fact is that the State has already created a policy stating that home care children and their families are to be educated on their options by the age of 17. But Rhode Island has not upheld its end of the bargain: Families find that they receive little to no communication from the State, and that when they reach out to find out their children’s care options, the State is slow to respond and typically unable to provide proactive guidance to help families navigate this change . “Modern medicine and advances in home care have allowed for many children to live past the age of 21. That should be a reason to celebrate, not a reason to cut an individual’s services off suddenly,” says Corinna’s mother Michelle. “Home care saves the state money, and it keeps families together. Why would you put a child in danger when it’s clear that home care has enabled them to live their best life?”

Families, home care providers, and and other organizations across the state are currently working with the State to identify a solution. Without home care, clients stand a greater risk of infection, hospitalization, or even a permanent move to a skilled nursing facility. Parents know that a child doesn’t stop being your child when they reach adulthood, but it’s time that Rhode Island recognize this as well.

South Carolina Families Suffer as Reimbursement Rates Stay Stagnant for Over a Decade

Home care clients like Rashad (right) can stay at home with skilled nursing care, but a lack of state funding is making it more difficult for many South Carolinians
Home care clients like Rashad (right) can stay at home with skilled nursing care, but a lack of state funding is making it more difficult for many South Carolinians

The facts are clear: Home care is less expensive than hospital or other institutional care. Plus, it enables medically complex children and adults to remain at home amongst their loved ones. But because the State of South Carolina has not increased reimbursement rates for skilled nursing home care services since 2008, families are finding it increasingly harder to access the skilled, high quality care that they need to stay as independent as possible in their communities.

State funding for home care has not been increased in more than a decade. At the same time, hospitals and other facilities have been steadily able to increase wages. Even more so, nurses can make more in home care in surrounding states. Now, home care providers find that they can compete for less than a quarter of all the nurses available in South Carolina. When agencies face such recruitment and retention struggles, home care recipients and their families suffer.

When there are less home care nurses available, families find that they experience missed shifts, which can not only create undue stress and chaos as loved ones must miss work, lose out on sleep, and forego other necessary activities—but it also puts the client in danger. For those who need skilled nursing care, missed shifts can mean dangerous consequences, including trips to the ER and unnecessary hospitalizations.

Even more so, many major home care providers have already left South Carolina because of the low funding for home care. Stagnant rates that are more than a decade old make keeping their doors open unsustainable. As more and more agencies leave the state, the harder it is for families to access care. Simply put, if the State does not take action to increase funding for home care, South Carolina’s most medically complex and vulnerable families will have few options for care.

South Carolina’s concerned families are making their voices heard: They are reaching out to their legislators and media to share their message: Increase funding for home health care so that families can access the high quality, reliable care that they need to be where they want to be: At home.

To find out how you can get involved in advocacy, contact us at advocacy@bayada.com today.

Home Health Care in the News

The New York Times recently published an article that highlights caregivers’ and home health care clients’ challenges

The looming home health care crisis has recently been making headlines. From Home Health Care News to the New York Times, industry leaders, home health aides, clients, and family caregivers have been sharing the same message: As Medicaid rates continue to stagnate, home health aides and nurses can’t make a fair wage. As a result, the industry is facing a worker shortage and clients’ access to care is being significantly threatened across the country. Below, please find links to recent media coverage on the issue, all of which present compelling data that point to an impending home health care crisis for the most vulnerable and medically fragile populations.

Home Health Care News, September 5: “Home Health Care Training Programs Popping Up As Caregiver Crisis Worsens”

New York Times, September 2: “On the Job, 24 Hours a Day, 27 Days a Month”

Thrive Global, August 30: “The Future of Healthcare: “First and foremost, reprioritize long-term care into the home setting” with David Totaro of BAYADA Home Health Care”

Vox, August 21:https://www.vox.com/the-highlight/2019/8/21/20694768/home-health-aides-elder-careHome health aides care for the elderly. Who will care for them?”

Everyday Health, July 27: “Demand on the Rise for Home Healthcare”

Home Health Care News, June 20: “Bayada Hits 1M Clients Served. Here’s Why Hitting 2M Will be More Difficult”

Delaware Hearts for Home Care Advocate Shares Heartfelt and Impactful Story with Legislators!

Recently, a Delaware pediatric licensed practical nurse (LPN), Charlene Chappell, signed up for Hearts for Home Care and wanted to get involved. And did she come out in full force!

After sharing powerful and heartfelt testimony in Dover, DE’s Legislative Hall about the impact she makes on families and the challenges low Medicaid rates bring to nurses who want to provide one-on-one care to families at home, Charlene listened to a radio show where host Joel Olsteen spoke about “an itch you just can’t scratch.”

That got Charlene thinking about more advocacy. Charlene said, “I feel that the majority of men and women that serve as elected officials have no clue what’s required of a family when they have a child that has special needs and is differently abled! They don’t understand that nurses need to be attracted to home care so that families can rely on this care to keep their medically-complex children at home.”

That inspired her to write the below story and send it to all Delaware legislators. Read Charlene’s powerful story below!

My Itch!

I have an itch! Mo matter how hard I try to let someone know, I can’t.  I’m 8 years old and I can’t tell Mommy where I itch! I can’t reach my itch! Its 2:30 in the morning and Mommy has fallen asleep in the chair next to my bed because she had to work today and then take my sister to her dance lesson. When she finally arrived home she threw some dirty laundry in the washer, and cooked dinner. After dinner she put the wash in the dryer, and then she loaded the dishwasher. She came in my room to check on me and feed me. Off she went to make sure my sister had done her homework and was in the shower. Oh no, an alarm is going off! Here comes Mommy. I wish I could tell her how much I love her for all she does and about my itch. She looks so tired. It’s almost 8:00 pm. The phone is ringing. Hurry Mommy before they hang up!

I can hear Mommy on the phone. “What! Oh no, please tell me it’s not true. I’m so tired tonight. I don’t know if I can stay up all night with him but I must. I have to make sure he’s ok on his ventilator and his medications are given at the right time, so he doesn’t have a seizure, and that the tube feeding is running properly. He has to be repositioned every two hours so his skin doesn’t break down. I have to check his diaper too. Well… thanks for the phone call.”

Oh no. Mommy just found out my favorite night nurse called out tonight, and the rest of forever. The agency is going to try and find a replacement as soon as possible, but that may take some time. Nurses aren’t as anxious to get into home health care nursing because they can make more money at a hospital. Mommy is going to miss work because she will have to stay up with me as Daddy’s gone from home with his job right now. Mommy may lose her job. I’m so sad my nurse left. She really knew me and she knew when I had an itch. She would gently scratch me all over till she found it, like Mommy does. She understands my cues and my facial expressions as I can’t talk, or walk, or move because of my illness. 

I heard Mommy talking to the lady at the agency about the nursing shortage in home health care. She told Mommy that the money provided for reimbursement by Medicaid, not Medicare, has not increased in 13 years! The last time there was an increase in Medicaid was in 2006! I wasn’t even born then! She also told Mommy that the companies are running out of their own funds to supply the raises the nurses deserve. God bless the nurses that do work in home health care, for a lesser wage then they deserve, and take care of not only me but my mommy and Daddy too. Without them my Mommy and Daddy would not get the proper rest, would have to quit work to care for me. It would not be a good thing for my family. We would all suffer. I don’t want to go anywhere but here in my room. What if we can’t find a new night nurse? Where will I go? I overheard the doctors and nurses at the hospital talking last time I was admitted for a bad seizure and they said that all children do better in the home setting for getting well once they can leave the hospital. They are less likely to get sick again from a disease they acquired while in the hospital, and all of us are more comfortable in our own bed!

I hope my story has helped you to understand why we need to increase the Medicaid budget. Not Medicare, but Medicaid. Mommy told me that some people get confused so that’s why I will say it one more time. Please increase the Medicaid funding for home health care nurses.

Thank you for reading this. Mommy thanks you as well as all the other children and their parents that require specialized home health care nursing.  And yes, Mommy found my itch!

Thank you, Charlene, for sharing your creative and passionate story with Delaware’s legislators. We must all share our voice to make an impact, and your advocacy highlights your deep commitment to your clients’ care.

Hearts for Home Care is seeking to advocate for higher reimbursement rates for skilled nursing services in Delaware so that nurses can be better attracted to home care, and so families that need this care to stay together at home can more easily and reliably access it. For information on how you can get involved, contact us today

Thank You for Keeping Me Home: A Message from an Advocate

North Carolina advocate Ari A. during a trip to Washington, D.C.

We often think of advocacy as sharing our stories, our challenges, and asking for legislative support in addressing those challenges. But advocacy is much more multi-faceted: It’s about building relationships by cultivating legislative connections so that they become home care supporters for life, and it’s certainly about saying Thank You when the support pays off by resulting in a law or policy that is beneficial to the individual and to the home care community at-large.

Below, find a Thank You note written by North Carolina home care recipient and Hearts for Home Care advocate Ari A. Ari has been able to thrive and stay independent at home because of the skilled nursing services he receives under North Carolina’s Medicaid program. Recently, he wrote to Medicaid staff to thank them for resolving a critical issue that enabled him to continue these services. Medicaid staff are committed to improving health and well-being of North Carolinians, and their transactions are often behind the scenes and receive little recognition. Hearts for Home Care applauds Medicaid staff across the country for their commitment to helping individuals stay at home, and we applaud Ari for his sincere thankfulness of their work.

To All I Work with in NC DHHS and Medicaid,

Some of you I’ve known for years and some a short time. Through it all, the one and most important factor that has been consistent has been the capacity to care. Time and time again over the years I have had to get battle ready in order to keep my life-saving services. However, instead having to scale cold-hard hearts, impenetrable like a fortress, you invited me into your hearts. You consistently agreed to provide for my intensive care in my home instead of a medical facility; which essentially would have been leaving me out in the cold to die. Instead of fighting me you have been my allies, always being there for me when I needed you the most.

These truths became ever more apparent a couple weeks ago. For the past two years, my mom and I have been getting things ready to transfer my medications, physical therapy, and supplies to Medicare without de-stabilizing my PDN services under Medicaid. It has been a mind numbing, complicated process. We have been hyper-vigilant not to miss any details that could easily be overlooked. We recently turned in sensitive paperwork to the Department of Social Services (DSS) well before the deadline. On November 30 we spoke with the Director of Policy and Procedures for Medicaid Sandy Terrell about how to safeguard my PDN even more during the transition. Ms. Terrell told Saunja Wilson from PDN to double check if everything was in order by the end of the month. Thank God, Ms. Wilson decided to check right away. The sensitive paperwork we emailed to DSS was present, but hadn’t been pulled up yet even though my caseworker had the paperwork in her email. One of the Supervisors at DSS had also confirmed that we had it turned in. We were told email or fax was equally acceptable for documentation.

The breakdown was that this particular caseworker did not use her email for business and preferred to have documents faxed to her. My caseworker tried to alleviate a little bit of pressure off my mom and I by telling us to ignore the ‘Termination of Medicaid Services’ notice in the mail. Yet, the absolute terror that rose up from the pits of our stomachs when we received the notice was totally indescribable! Despite the paperwork being directly faxed to my caseworker, we still waited for the approval. Thankfully over a week later, the situation was taken over by one of the Supervisors at DSS. She rose to the occasion and kindly brought the matter to a close so that my mom and I could peacefully go on with our lives.

Frighteningly, the bottom line is that I am not exaggerating when I say my life would have been ‘Terminated’ if Saunja Wilson from PDN hadn’t been ‘quick on the draw’ to find the error. If Ms. Wilson had waited to check just two or three days later, I wouldn’t have been able to disregard the Termination notice and my life would have been ruined! I say again, Thank God for my champions in NC government. You always rises up out of the mist to do a heroic save! This is what the rest of America could be and should be as far as healthcare policy.

Frighteningly, the bottom line is that I am not exaggerating when I say my life would have been ‘Terminated’ if Saunja Wilson from PDN hadn’t been ‘quick on the draw’ to find the error. If Ms. Wilson had waited to check just two or three days later, I wouldn’t have been able to disregard the Termination notice and my life would have been ruined! I say again, Thank God for my champions in NC government. You always rises up out of the mist to do a heroic save! This is what the rest of America could be and should be as far as healthcare policy.

All of you keep doing a spectacular job and always keep your focus on the people you serve instead of the numbers, especially as NC transitions to Managed Care. If you ever need my help just let me know anytime!

Sincerely,

Ari A. Charlotte, NC

New York State Budget Finalized with $550 Million Increase Restored for Medicaid Funding

Earlier this year, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo announced his plan for the 2020 state budget, including a 3.6% planned budgeted increase to overall health care spending. When proposed tax revenue estimates came in much lower than anticipated, the administration decided to cut approximately $550 million of this increase. But after strong advocacy efforts from many health care groups across the state, the Governor and his administration changed their position, keeping the $550 million Medicaid increase in the budget.

BAYADA’s Government Affairs Office (GAO) participated in several conference calls with the New York State Home Care Association (HCA) to learn more about Medicaid spending, which accounts for 42% of the budget, and what we and our office staff, clients, and families can do to advocate for higher wages for home care nurses through increased reimbursement rates. 

Currently, New York’s Medicaid reimbursement rates are well-below surrounding states, so many caregivers are discouraged from entering—or staying in—the home care industry due to abysmal wages. It also impacts BAYADA because the rates are currently so low that we are currently not be able to provide sustainable Medicaid-based home care in the state and pay caregivers an appropriate wage.

As part of a larger national trend, New York did vote to increase the statewide minimum wage to $15 per hour incrementally through 2021. New York understands that home care providers that do provide Medicaid-based services would not be able to comply with this minimum wage mandate and stay sustainable under current rates. The final budget did include an additional $1.1 billion to support the cost of raising minimum wage for health care workers. BAYADA is currently advocating for similar increases in other GAO states that have increased the mandatory minimum wage, but have not increased reimbursement rates in tandem. Medicaid rates must keep pace with the rising cost of living and increased wage mandates to ensure that providers can stay in business, and to ensure that vulnerable New Yorkers can have access to quality home care.

Where Does the Money Go? NC State Budget and Bill Tracking Update

State Budget Update

North Carolina is required to balance its budget each year, and health and human services makes up 22.4% of the already tight $24 billion budget

In North Carolina and across BAYADA’s GAO states, our legislative goals tend to revolve around two main tenets: First, achieving policies that streamline processes so that service offices can operate without added burdens and so residents can readily access care, and second, to increase reimbursement rates so that we can recruit and retain the caregivers necessary and ensure that we have the supply necessary to meet the demand.  

It seems like common sense—North Carolinians want to stay in their homes, and home care services cost states less than care delivery in a different setting. So why can’t legislators simply fund home care programs at higher rates? The truth is that there are many competing interests and priorities, and limited amounts of state resources.

It is important to recognize the constraints with which lawmakers must work. Last year, Health & Human Services represented 22.4% of North Carolina’s nearly $24 billion state budget, second only to education, which represented 57.5%. Looking forward to the upcoming budget year, the state’s fiscal research arm reported that top budget pressures include: public schools, higher education, the state health plan, and Medicaid/Health Choice—meaning that there is a lot of pressure on the state’s already tight budget—and that’s not to mention the other interest groups we compete with, such as state nursing homes and other healthcare coalitions.

As GAO continues to garner legislative support for $29.5 million in state funds needed for the Medicaid rate increases we are seeking, advocacy efforts will play an important role. Please watch for ways to support our legislative ask, and please reach out to Mike Sokoloski at msokoloski@bayada.com to learn how you can get involved in advocacy on behalf of your staff and clients.

NC Bills we are following


“I’m just a bill” – Knowing the path by which a bill must travel is important as we follow various bills. 

To date, 824 bills have been filed in the North Carolina General Assembly this session. GAO continues to work through the proposed bills to evaluate their impact on home health care, home care, and hospice. Below are a few bills that are of interest:

1. H70 – Delay NC HealthConnex for Certain Providers, sponsored by Representatives Dobson, Murphy, White, and Lambeth

Home care champion Representative Josh Dobson submitted the bill that extends the deadline by which certain providers, including home care and home health care agencies, must participate in and submit data to the state’s Health Information Exchange Network, NC HealthConnex.  We commend the bill sponsors for this delay.

While participation in and submission to NC HealthConnex is important and necessary in that it grants both the state and providers electronic, timely access to demographic and clinical data, our industry and others provider sectors do not have a consistent platform or an easy way to gather and transmit the required data. Access to this data and clinical information will help the state and providers identify spending trends that will facilitate health care cost containment while also improving health care outcomes only if the data is reliable and consistently reported.

This extended deadline proposed by House Bill 70 grants us additional time to meet the reporting requirements.  We thank all the bill signatories for recognizing the administrative burden and granting additional time to meet the requirement.

The bill passed both the House floor on March 27, 2019 and is headed to the Senate.

2. H745– Medicaid Funding Request for Private Duty Nursing (PDN), sponsored by Representatives White, Lambeth, Adcock, and Cunningham

Our health care members, a home care nurse (White), a hospital administrator (Lambeth), a nurse practitioner (Adcock), and a hospice nurse (Cunningham), introduced H745 to increase the Medicaid funding for nursing under PDN from $39.60 to $45.00 by requesting $4.1M for 2019-2020 and $8.3M for 2020-2021 in recurring state funds.

As health care leaders, they recognize the importance our services play in keeping some of North Carolina’s most clinically complex citizen at home and out of more expensive settings. While the necessary funds were not allocated in the House Budget, we have an opportunity to get it into the Senate Budget and are continuing to advocate for this option.   

3. H728– Increase Innovation Waiver Slots, sponsored by Representatives Insko, Hawkins, and Lambeth

This bill appropriates 500 Innovation Waiver Slots to address the waiting lists. It would support North Carolinians living with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) and help them receive needed services within their home and community.  The bill proposes to appropriate $5.3M for 2019-2020 and $10,9M for 2020-2021 in recurring funds.

4. S361– Increase Innovation Waiver Slots, sponsored by Representatives Insko, Hawkins, and Lambeth

This proposed bill attempts to address several different health care issues in one bill. This approach makes it challenging to garner support in its entirety.  The bill includes the following provisions:

  • Elimination of Certificate of Need (CON) – Any action that erodes the established process by which a need is determined may lead to destabilizing our health care industry. The established CON process allows for any group to apply for a Special Needs Determination should they feel health care needs are not being met in their community.
  • Establishes a carve-out for PACE organization – Any action that allows a group to be exempt from following Home Care Licensure Rules puts recipients at risk as the organization would not be required to follow health and safety rules outlined state licensure.
  • Medicaid Expansion – Any opportunity for the North Carolina’s working poor to have access to health care coverage, the better. This provision includes a work requirement with exceptions for individuals attending school and or deemed disabled.
  • Addition of Innovation Waiver Slots – Any opportunity for more individuals living with intellectual and development disabilities (I/DD) to have access to needed services, the better.

The introduction of this bill is the first step in a long process. GAO will continue to monitor and support the I/DD slot provision which aligns with our access to care goals. Some of the other items are very controversial because they create a slippery slope on oversight.

To find out what you can do to encourage your legislators to support the introduction of this bill, contact Lee Dobson at ldobson@bayada.com.

25 BAYADA Advocates Gather for Inspiring and Record-Breaking Legislative Day in Columbia, SC

Top left & bottom right: 25 BAYADA employees and clients joined the South Carolina Home Care and Hospice Association’s second annual Legislative Advocacy Day
Top right: Stephanie Black, Vickie Nelson, Dave Totaro, and Melissa Allman meet with Senator Thomas Nelson (center)
Bottom left: BAYADA Rock Hill (ROC) office employees pose in front of the SC capitol. Left to right: Nurse Michelle Ghent, Director Jenni Cairns, and nurse Cathy Medeiros (2017 LPN National Hero)

On March 6, 24 energetic BAYADA employees and one BAYADA Assistive Care State Programs (ACSP) client gathered in South Carolina’s state capitol for a day of meaningful and heartfelt advocacy. The South Carolina Home Care and Hospice Association (SCHCHA) hosted its second annual Legislative Advocacy Day, and this year, a record-breaking total of nearly 60 advocates attended!

BAYADA’s advocates joined other attendees and walked the halls with a clear message: Investing in our Nursing Medicaid Waiver programs will save the state money and keep our medically fragile children, disabled adults, and seniors home with their loved ones and out of higher cost facilities.  We care about home care, and so should you!

With their passionate message in hand, advocates spoke with over 50 legislators about the importance of home care. This year we were able to speak to all key lawmakers in both the House and Senate to ensure our message was heard by as many ears–and the right ears–as possible.

“Advocacy can’t be effective with only one person working towards a goal–one voice can only go so far! That’s why I am so proud to work in South Carolina, where so many of our office employees, field employees, and clients recognize the importance of sharing their voices too. The more impassioned people we have involved, the more of a difference we can make on behalf of all South Carolinians that rely on home care,” said GAO director Melissa Allman.

BAYADA employees were excited and inspired by the impact they made that day. Thank you to the many participants for the difference you make on behalf of all South Carolinians that rely on home care to stay independent in their communities!

Home Health Aides’ Low Wages: Turning Public Awareness into Action

Home health aides keep hundreds of thousands of disabled adults and seniors at home and out of costlier settings. Low Medicaid reimbursement rates keep them from making a better wage, and it's up to state governments to address this issue.
Home health aides keep hundreds of thousands of disabled adults and seniors at home and out of costlier settings.

As home care clients, employees, caregivers, and family members, we know one thing for a fact: Home health aides do incredible, compassionate work that enable hundreds of thousands of residents across the country to stay at home and out of costlier, more infectious settings like nursing homes and hospitals. And we certainly know another fact: The work that aides do is invaluable, and it’s time that they begin to receive a fair wage for the hard work they do.

Low aide wages have recently made national headlines and the message is clear: We will need more and more home health aides as America’s population continues to age. But home health care providers are having trouble recruiting and retaining the quality, reliable workforce needed to keep up with the growing demand.

Recently, Hearts for Home Care advocate and BAYADA Home Health Care’s chief government affairs officer, Dave Totaro, submitted his opinion on the matter to STAT News, a media company focused on finding and telling compelling stories about health, medicine, and scientific discovery. He posed the question:

“To say that home health aides’ work is demanding is an understatement. They make it possible for 14 million Americans to stay in their homes and out of expensive and impersonal institutional settings like hospitals and nursing homes. Performing this necessary and in-demand work takes a physical and emotional toll, yet these individuals do it with compassion day in and day out.

So why do we treat home health aides as low-wage, low-value workers?”

The problem lies primarily in states’ low Medicaid funding for home care programs. Though states typically pay an hourly rate for providers who deliver home health aide services, these rates have largely been low for many years, or raised periodically, but at a rate too low to keep up with real costs of living and providing services. Because these rates must cover wages, training, benefits, new hire costs such as background checks and TB shots, and supplies, it is nearly impossible for home health care companies to take such a low rate and provide aides with a wage high enough to compete with industries like fast food and retail.

News coverage of the issue has been effective in bringing greater public awareness to the issue, especially as nearly all individuals will be touched by home care at least once in their lives, whether it be for themselves, a parent, friend, or other loved one. Now is the time to take awareness and turn it into action. Call your state legislator and let them know what home care means to you. Contact advocacy@bayada.com for information on what you can do to share your voice and support home health aides.

North Carolina’s Efforts Towards Medicaid Transformation Continue to Move Forward

The General Assembly passed two bills, H. 403  and H. 156,  which work together to clarify the implementation of the Standard and Behavioral Health/Intellectual-Developmental Disability (BH/I-DD) Tailored Plans and the licensure requirements for Prepaid Health Plan (PHP) managers under Medicaid Transformation.

In a historic move, legislators voted to move Medicaid recipients with mild-to-moderate behavioral health needs under the Standard Plan for Medicaid services. Individuals with a serious mental illness, a serious emotional disturbance, a severe substance use disorder, an intellectual/developmental disability, US DOJ settlement consumers, or individuals who have survived a traumatic brain injury are the defined population that will fall under the Tailored Plan.

The BH/I-DD Tailored Plan will begin one year after the Standard Plan with the LME/MCOs as the lead plan managers working with another PHP to offer the physical healthcare services for Tailored Plan Medicaid recipients for four years after that. The timelines incorporated in these bills push for North Carolina to complete the transition to the Standard and Tailored Plans as well as moving other specialty populations under managed care within five years of CMS approval.

GAO and our internal advisory workgroup continues to provide feedback through stakeholder involvement to ensure access to quality care as North Carolina moves toward Managed Care. If you have any questions about this process or the future of Medicaid in our state, please email me at ldobson@bayada.com.