New Year, New Home Care Wishes for 2022

2021 has been an incredible year for home care advocates, who continued to discover that meeting with legislators and sharing their personal home care stories did not have to occur in-person only. Embracing an increasingly digital world has been an advantage to many home care clients, caregivers, and families who are home-bound or have mobility issues—or are just plain too busy to be able to travel to and from legislative meetings.

Additionally, in the second year of COVID, many state and federal decision makers started to truly understand why home care makes sense: It keeps vulnerable individuals at home and out of potentially-infectious institutions, and it saves Medicaid programs money by doing so. 2021 was filled with many legislative accomplishments in which lawmakers opted to increase funding for home care programs in light of the ever-persistent challenges home care clients and families continue to face—primarily the difficulty in accessing home care when there is still—despite increasing funding—a workforce shortage.

In-home nurses, home health aides, and other caregivers are the backbone of the home health care industry. Home care would not be possible without these compassionate heroes that help families stay together. And while 2021 was filled with accomplishments, two advocates share their New Year’s hopes and show us why we all must recommit ourselves to home health care advocacy in 2022.

Below, see what home care client Ari A. of North Carolina, and home care mom Jill P. shared with us regarding the challenges they still face, and what they hope to see in the New Year.

Ari A. – Home care client in North Carolina

Ari with nurse Katrina Clagg, LPN.

I can’t tell you how much of a God-send it was to recently learn the fantastic news. NC Governor Cooper signed a budget that raised the Medicaid reimbursement for Private Duty Nursing (PDN) by 13.6%! I know so many people, including myself, who have been struggling to get their shifts covered because of low pay. These struggles go back several years, even before the pandemic. COVID -19 just made the staffing crisis in home care more visible to the public. I’m glad it did. It meant that the NC legislature could see more clearly the dire need, and they acted. Talk about seizing the moment! For this, the NC General Assembly will forever have my gratitude. 

Now that PDN can be more competitive with higher pay, hopefully nurses in other fields will see why we love home care. We love it because it is a protective shield that protects patients like me from the harm that can happen to us each and every day. Just last week my airway became totally blocked all of the sudden. Once again, one of my nurses saved my life. She acted professionally and calmly as she quickly fixed the problem. I wouldn’t have gotten such a fast response anywhere else other than one-on-one care at home. Without it, I certainly would have died. 

Home care to me also means love. I get to spend my life at home, sharing the love of my family, instead of being stuck in a medical facility, or not alive at all. It’s the best Christmas gift that keeps on giving all year round! 

So for all you working in the hospital or as a travel nurse, I have great hopes for 2022. Home care overall is fast becoming the new front line of medical care. More and more people that need complex care are coming home from the hospital and we need you! Simply put, taking care of people in their own home is the best way to advance your skills and help vital members of the community as well. Chronically ill patients like me are ready to welcome you into our homes with open arms. You will find that it is one of the greatest gifts you will receive! 

With Much Thankfulness, 

Aaron “Ari” Anderson 

Jill P. – Maryland mother of home care client Nadiya

Nadiya (front) is able to spend the holidays at home with mom Jill and her family

Nadiya shares a smile in her MD home.

Our 17 year old daughter Nadiya has life threatening seizures and multiple complex disabilities caused by a rare genic disease. She relies on night nursing to keep her safe. It is essential but for the last several weeks we have had only 2 of our 7 nights covered.

It is difficult to find capable, reliable nurses who have the skills to manage complex unpredictable seizures and assist with her activities of daily life. Because we live close to DC, many good nurses choose to work in DC where they can make more money through higher Medicaid reimbursement rates.

My child’s future health and safety as she transitions into adulthood, is reliant on home care. This is a great concern for our family. The pandemic has made this already complicated problem much worse. For 2022, I hope that more state and federal lawmakers continue to see how impactful home care is for families. I hope that more families become involved in advocacy and share their stories so that there is a groundswell for better wages and incentives for these frontline workers.

Home care nurses are an essential support that need to be valued and compensated competitively for their important work. Until that changes Nadiya’s future care is not secure. 

Jill Pelovitz

Parent, Caregiver, and Passionate Advocate

Pennsylvania Home Care Recipients Advocate for Better Access to Home Care

 Pennsylvania ranks seventh in the nation for the percent of its population that is 65 years of age or older1. As Baby Boomers continue to age and the population of older adults needing long-term care increases, the need for caregivers will continue to increase as well. Since COVID shined a light on major drawbacks of congregate living facilities like nursing homes and institutions, it is not just the elderly population that are choosing to be cared for at home. This is great news for the hundreds of thousands of individuals and families who prefer to age at home rather than in a facility. However, it also poses a major problem: there aren’t enough caregivers to take care of the current Pennsylvania population at home let alone the 29% growth that will occur by 2028, leaving a shortage of 73,000 home health aides2. This is due in large part to low state funding for Medicaid programs like Pennsylvania’s Personal Assistance Services (PAS) that cares for medically fragile individuals.

Stephen Hoppy from Luzerne County, PA with his home health aides

This is where our advocates come in. Home care recipients across the Commonwealth have banded together to help alleviate this growing caregiver shortage. Advocates like Stephen Hoppy from Luzerne County, PA are speaking out and helping raise awareness of the inadequate state funding. Stephen is approved for 20 hours per day of care from the PAS program, but since he cannot find enough caregivers to cover all those hours, he has been paying $500 per week out of his own pocket to help secure that coverage. Recently, Stephen was interviewed by FOX56 News about how the caregiver shortage has affected him.

“I am advocating because our healthcare system is compromised. There are plenty of people worse off than me that can’t get home care, which is unacceptable. These home health aides are medical professionals, and they need to be paid for their expertise and knowledge,” says Stephen.

COVID has only exacerbated this issue, with a mass exodus of health care workers no longer willing to risk their lives for a career that yields an average of only $12.40/hour. BAYADA Home Health Care has had to deny 40% of PAS cases in 2020 and 2021 because there were not enough caregivers to staff the cases. Teri Henning, the executive director of the Pennsylvania Homecare Association (PHA), says she’s hearing similar numbers from PAS providers across the board. “They simply cannot compete for the workforce,” she says. “Home health aides can earn more money doing similar work in other state home care programs, or in nursing homes, or even doing less physically- and emotionally-demanding work at Amazon, Target, or in fast food.”

“BAYADA Home Health Care has had to deny 40% of PAS cases in 2020 and 2021 because there were not enough caregivers to staff the cases.”

Pittsburgh resident, Maria Kolat with son Matthew

Home care advocate and mother, Maria, from Pittsburgh has also joined Hearts for Home Care’s advocacy efforts after experiencing these issues firsthand with her 22-year-old son, Matthew, who is developmentally disabled and requires non-stop supervision. Since COVID, their lives have dramatically changed—his schooling, his ability to receive psychological and medical care and—very significantly—his family’s ability to access the home health aide (HHA) care that Matthew needs and is qualified to receive. Maria and Matthew were featured on Pittsburgh’s local KDKA 2CBS station advocating on behalf of home health aides.

“Aides are leaving the caregiving field to work at big retail like Walmart and Amazon—or in fast food,” says Maria. “They can make $15 an hour or more there. When we see a revolving door of aides, Matthew can’t get the one-on-one care he needs, which puts him at risk.”

Home care advocates like Stephen and Maria give life to our advocacy efforts ─ their real-life experiences aren’t just numbers and statistics, but genuine struggles that thousands of Pennsylvanians endure every single day. They help tell the story so that legislators and influencers can fully grasp how their decisions are affecting their constituents and communities.

Home care advocates like Stephen and Maria give life to our advocacy efforts.

At the end of the day, when aides are not being drawn into working in home care, it’s Pennsylvania’s most vulnerable residents like Matthew and Stephen who suffer. PHA, home care providers, and advocates are asking the State to increase funding for the PAS program. Additional funding would put home care agencies in a better position to recruit and retain more HHAs, and thus ensure that PAS beneficiaries can continue to access the care they need to stay safe and healthy at home.

  1. https://www.leadingagepa.org/Portals/0/154869%20Long%20Term%20Care%20Statistics%20Book%20revised%20final.pdf page 14.
  2. https://mercer.healthcare-workforce.us/ +math

Advocacy Matters!

At Hearts for Home Care, we help those that care about home care by enabling you to get involved at the capacity in which you’re able to do so. Email us at advocacy@bayada.com or follow us on Facebook.com/Hearts4HomeCare in order to learn more about the home care advocacy community and find opportunities to get involved.

2020 Ambassador of the Year: Brad Needham

Advocacy became part of the culture at BAYADA Home Health Care a little over 10 years ago out of a need for a collective voice to speak on behalf of our clients, families, and field staff who are impacted every day by home care

As Chief Government Affairs Officer Dave Totaro, likes to say, “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” That’s why we created the Hearts for Home care program. The more voices in support of home care, the better we can protect the industry and the millions of US residents in need of this care. If politicians, media, and key decisionmakers aren’t aware of the challenges facing home care today–and the essential benefit it provides to our most vulnerable populations—they won’t be part of the solution.

So, we banded together a voluntary group of advocates within the company with the single purpose of acting as a voice for those in the home care community that may not have had the opportunity otherwise ─ they are our Hearts for Home Care Ambassadors. 

Our ambassadors serve as the liaison between the Hearts for Home Care advocacy team and their co-workers and home care community. Their primary responsibility is to develop and foster relationships with their direct-constituent legislators to spread awareness and advocate for better wages for field staff, more approved hours for clients, and the overall governmental investment in the home care industry. Year after year, our ambassadors go above and beyond to ensure legislators are aware of the crucial importance of home care for so many families across the country. 

Last week, Hearts for Home Care presented the 2020 National Ambassador of the Year Award to director of Assistive State Programs in Delaware, Bradley Needham for his role as a dedicated, passionate, and influential ambassador. Throughout 2020, Brad quickly became one of Delaware’s “go to” senior ambassadors, solidifying himself as a strong leader in the advocacy realm. There has never been an elected official who he hasn’t been willing to speak with, a town hall he hasn’t been willing to attend, or an action alert he hasn’t acted on.

Delaware State Representative, Mike Smith congratulating AOTY winner, Brad Needham.

Brad brings tremendous passion to his work as a senior ambassador, as well as a knowledge of home care that almost always sets the tone for his legislative meetings. Even as 2020 brought new and unique challenges to the government advocacy space, Brad continued to meet them head on, going so far as to take ownership of developing and maintain relationships with new and veteran legislators on both sides of the aisle.

Brad helped lead the effort in securing a home health aide rate floor in Delaware, ensuring home health aide reimbursement rates are equitable or above market averages. When organizations like H4HC advocate for those who can’t advocate for themselves, change for the better can happen ─ new laws are drafted and policies are amended to strengthen support of these important services.

Advocacy Matters!

At Hearts for Home Care, we help those that care about home care by enabling you to get involved at the capacity in which you’re able to do so. Email us at advocacy@bayada.com or follow us on Facebook.com/Hearts4HomeCare in order to learn more about the home care advocacy community and find opportunities to get involved.

Home Care Has a Distinct Place in the Future of US Healthcare

States are beginning to make key changes to increase families’ access to home care

The COVID-19 pandemic has increased people’s awareness of the US healthcare system’s dependence on institutional care, and the potential dangers that come with a reliance on congregate healthcare settings. Nursing homes and hospital are a necessary part of the healthcare continuum, but COVID has undoubtedly increased the public’s appetite for—and governments’ understanding of—accessible home care.

90% of America’s seniors say that they prefer to age in place…

COVID may have a long-term effect on healthcare policy, as it has shifted the spotlight to the inherent benefits of home-based care. Home care is cost-effective: It costs governments, insurance companies, and individual families less to provide care in the home than in a hospital or facility. It’s also patient preferred: 90% of America’s seniors say that they prefer to age in place, and families with medically-fragile children and adults know their loved ones do better when they are in their own home environments.

In general, across the US, funding for home care programs continues to lag behind funding for services delivered in facilities like hospitals and nursing homes.

Home care advocates—state and national home care associations, providers, home care employees, and clients & families—have been advocating for better funding and better policies for home care for years with mixed success. In general, across the US, funding for home care programs continues to lag behind funding for services delivered in facilities like hospitals and nursing homes. But in this first post-COVID budget season, advocates have seen successes!

We’ve moved the needle: Several states increased their Medicaid funding for home care programs. The New Jersey legislature increased funding for home care by $2 more per hour, and for skilled nursing home care by $10 more per hour. Additionally, Delaware increased funding for skilled in-home nursing by 15%, and Georgia, Indiana, Missouri, and Pennsylvania have increased funding for private duty nursing by 10% or more. Thank you to these states for recognizing the importance of home care.  Increased funding will help thousands of children, seniors, and adults with disabilities and medical complexities access the home care they’ve been struggling to access due to caregiver shortages that have plagued the nation.

Other states have increased funding for home care at smaller increments, including Minnesota and Vermont. While any increase is appreciated, there is still work to do in these states and many others: Increasing funding, and reviewing it regularly, is essential in ensuring that caregivers’ wages can remain competitive as costs of living continue to rise year by year. If home care funding is raised now, but then ignored for years to come, then families that need home care will be back to the same situation they were in pre-pandemic: Struggling to find the care they need to stay safe and healthy at home.

On behalf of the home care community, thank you to the many legislators and decision-makers who have supported home care this year!

Advocates in Action: Dimpal Patel Inspires NC Ambassadors at Ambassador Symposium

Client Dimpal P. inspires Ambassadors during North Carolina’s Ambassador Symposium

On March 28, our annual North Carolina Hearts for Home Care Ambassador Symposium took place, where we provided tools and resources to our volunteer Ambassadors. The training focused on a variety of topics, including leading a legislative meeting and building relationships with lawmakers. 

In addition to special guests former Representative Bill Brawley, Senior Healthcare Campaign Director of MomsRising Felicia Burnett, Association for Home & Hospice Care’s VP of Government Affairs Tracy Colvard, and Staff Attorney with Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy Louise Pocock, the shining star of the Symposium was client Dimpal, who inspired all of our Ambassadors with her story of her journey into advocacy.

Beyond detailing the specific challenges she and her family face as a result of low state Medicaid reimbursement rates, Dimpal also described the ways in which home care and her nurses have changed her life and granted her independence:

“Without my nurses, I wouldn’t have been able to go to college and to live a full life. Without them, I’d likely be stuck in a hospital or a nursing home,” said Dimpal.  

It was this gratitude for her nurses that propelled Dimpal to share her story and to advocate for others who rely on the state’s Private Duty Nursing (PDN) program to survive.

To hear more about Dimpal and the importance of advocacy, you can watch her full speech here. You can also read about her nursing care in the Gaston Gazette after a reporter came to her house to learn more about how her nurses impact her everyday life.

Special thanks to our Hearts for Home Care Ambassadors for volunteering their time and talents advocating for our staff and clients!

To learn about ways you can get involved in advocacy, email advocacy@bayada.com today

Maryland Receives Major Medicaid Rate Increase- 30% Over the Next Six Years!

Great things happen when we advocate together! After years of advocacy from BAYADA, our partners, and many parents and home care employees, the Maryland General Assembly recently passed two pieces of legislation that collectively will increase all Medicaid home and community-based services reimbursement rates by more than 30% over the next six years. Though initially met with opposition from Governor Larry Hogan, the Maryland General Assembly heard our voices and overwhelmingly voted to override his veto of one of the bills.

The first bill, the state’s annual budget, provides a rate increase of 3% that will go into effect July 1, 2019. The second bill, also effective July 1, 2019, contains an amendment which will increase reimbursement rates by 4% each year between July 1, 2020 and July 1, 2025.

Currently, Marylanders who rely on in-home nursing care have only 83% of their authorized hours filled, meaning that families struggle to fill their medically complex loved ones’ skilled home nursing care nearly 20% of the time! We have found that Medicaid rates have stagnated below the cost of living and below wages seen in other settings—such as hospitals and facilities—and surrounding states—and that families were struggling to fill these hours. We are hopeful that these access-to-care issues will be alleviated as providers will be able to recruit and retain nurses within the home care industry, and that more of Maryland’s most medically complex will be able to stay safe where they want to be—in their own homes.

This was a true team effort led by BAYADA and the Maryland National-Capital Area Home Care Association (MNCHA) and including MNCHA member providers, several individual families, parent advocacy organizations and disease-specific advocacy organizations. Special thanks to JoAnn Saxby, Patrick O’Malley, Eddie Dyer, Patty Watson, and Susan Ingalls who all played important parts in making this happen and to BAYADA Delaware employees Mandy Brady, Kristyn Kelsch, and Taylor Kosinski who went above and beyond to advocate in their sister state. Mike Sokoloski, Tara Montague, and Nicole Onofrio were instrumental in supporting two Town Halls and Legislative Day, and Alisa Fox coordinated timely articles in The Baltimore Sun, The Washington Post, and on WDVM TV in Western Maryland. Maggie Tracy managed countless logistical hurdles and supported direct lobbying and grassroots efforts.

Thank you to everyone who played a role in this major achievement! Advocacy cannot succeed if only one voice is heard, and your advocacy has contributed to the well-being of so many Marylanders in need of home care.

For more information on this increase, or how you can get involved in advocacy in Maryland, please contact Shannon Gahs at sgahs@bayada.com.

Pennsylvania Homecare Association (PHA) Legislative Day Pictures

On April 9, more than 300 home care advocates—clients, families, caregivers, and employees—joined the Pennsylvania Homecare Association (PHA) at the state capitol in Harrisburg. Advocates met with hundreds of the state’s representatives and senators to deliver an important message: Home care is important to me, and it should be important to you too.

Check out pictures from the legislative reception, the kickoff rally, legislative day meetings, and the PHA press conference! Care about home care and want to share your voice? Check out heartsforhomecare.com or email advocacy@bayada.com to find out how you can get involved in advocacy today!

CLICK TO SEE PICTURES

NJ: GAO Hits the Road to Meet with Service Offices Across the State

GAO Director Louise Lindenmeier (center) meets with the PAS office to learn about their struggles recruiting and retaining quality aides

Every year, the Government Affairs Office (GAO) travels the state to connect with our service offices about our legislative priorities and the importance of advocacy. Not only do these visits give us the opportunity to share the work we do to improve the state of home health care in New Jersey, but they also give us the unique chance to hear about the challenges you all often face in attempting to deliver the compassionate, excellent, and reliable care that our clients deserve.

Throughout our visits so far, we have been able to celebrate our collective successes and accomplishments. In 2018, our GAO Ambassadors and service office employees attended a number of district office visits and legislative receptions, and participated in phone banks, letter writing campaigns, and action alerts all in support of accomplishing legislative priorities that support our nurses, aides, clients, and families. Without your partnership and collaboration, we would be unable to deliver on our promise to act as the voice for BAYADA and its clients and employees.

GAO gets groovy with the PER office!

In addition to celebrating last year’s successes, we have worked together to identify ongoing challenges and to form our 2019 legislative priorities and strategies. As we’ve formed these priorities, it is clear that our grassroots efforts and your continued commitment to advocacy will be integral to achieving our goals.

Thank you to the many offices who have made the time to meet with us. In 2019, we will continue our outreach effort to accomplish our goal of meeting with 100% of our New Jersey service offices. If you’d like to learn more about our road show, our 2019 legislative priorities, or getting more involved in advocacy at BAYADA, contact advocacy@bayada.com.

NC: SHE, GAS, and RAN Offices Demonstrate Advocacy by Building Relationships and Sharing Clients’ Stories


Sen. Alexander (back left) visits BAYADA client Rusty (front left) and his nurse, Vikki (front right) with BAYADA staff Cheryl, Jillian, and Rusty’s mother (back right).

GAO can’t do it alone, and in North Carolina we are proud to have so many employees that understand the impact of sharing their voice on behalf of all our staff and clients!

SHE and GAS Host Impactful Home Visit

Last month two offices, SHE and GAS, teamed up to host a home visit with newly elected Senator Ted Alexander. Our BAYADA team of advocates, including MIM Division Director Joe Seidel, GAS Clinical Associate Cheryl Reading and GAS Client Services Manager Jillian Fernald, as well as the client’s long-time nurse Vikki, spoke passionately about our services and the challenges we face in care delivery.

The visit was a grand success! The importance of home care and the work you do every day was certainly not lost on Sen. Alexander, whose wife and daughter are both nurses: “Our goal,” he explained, “is to keep families where they belong, together and at home.” These types of interactions lay the foundation for support of our legislative asks because the decision-makers see first-hand the impact home care has on families.

RAN Builds Relationships in a Different Way


BAYADA Ribbon Cutting Ceremony with Senator Wiley Nickel

Last month, the RAN office hosted a ribbon cutting ceremony to commemorate the grand opening of our new state-of-the-art simulation lab and training center. This was no regular ribbon cutting ceremony where the office invited current and prospective nurses to tour and see-in-action the simulation lab. We took the opportunity to educate lawmakers on the scope and breadth of what is possible in the home by inviting Senator Wiley Nickel to welcome the group. We also included Ed Troha, Vice President for the NC Chamber, who has four nurses in his family, to speak about the importance of the training center in job creation.

Additionally, former Senior Chairman for House Appropriations Nelson Dollar issued a proclamation to show his strong and constant support for home care. This center allows BAYADA to train nurses using real life scenarios that helps develop confidence, competence, and builds career-building skills to home health care nurse. Increasing awareness among legislators and other community leaders on the benefits of home care helps garner support as we work toward our legislative goals. 

Thank you to the many North Carolina staff and families that regularly share their voices in advocacy! To find out how you can get more involved, contact GAO Director Lee Dobson today!

New Hearts for Home Care Member Showcases Advocacy at Home!

Left: Gaston Gazette reporter chats with Dimpal and her BAYADA nurse Amy.
Center: Dimpal’s long-time nurse Chastity helped Dimpal live on campus and graduate from UNC Charlotte!
Right: Dimpal’s nurse Toni has been by her side for nearly a decade.

Oftentimes, when we hear the word “advocacy” we think about attending a BAYADA-sponsored lobby day in a state capitol or visiting a legislator’s local office to ask him or her to support or oppose a piece of legislation. While both those options are in fact forms of advocacy, they’re not the only ones.

North Carolina client Dimpal Patel recently joined Hearts for Home Care, a program that BAYADA’s Government Affairs Office began to get clients, families, staff members, and the community at-large more engaged in legislative advocacy. She expressed that she wanted to get involved, but as an individual with a trach, vent, and wheelchair, she would need a lot of assistance traveling to advocate in person.

The Hearts for Home Care team immediately encouraged her to reach out to her local paper by submitting a short opinion piece about her thoughts on home care. She shared an insightful take on how her nurses enabled her to live on campus and graduate from UNC Charlotte, as well as how important Medicaid is for her and so many others that rely on home care.

The Gaston Gazette received her piece, but instead of publishing it, they sent a reporter to Dimpal’s home to get a better look at how home care impacts her life first-hand. The reporter spoke with Dimpal and her nurse, Amy, about the importance of legislators’ mindfulness of continued Medicaid funding—and her story made the paper’s front page!

“I’ve always wanted to get more involved in advocacy because I think it’s important that our state and federal decision makers hear our voice and understand how important home care is in our communities… but I was always worried because I can’t get to the state capitol or to legislative hearings as easily as others can. I’m grateful that Hearts for Home Care has given me the tools to help me begin my advocacy journey from home,” Dimpal told us recently.

Home care by its very nature often helps those with limited mobility to live a full life and remain at home. That’s why the Hearts for Home Care team developed a robust menu of advocacy activities—so that anyone who wants to get involved in advocacy can! Reaching out to legislators via traditional media or social media, calling into a town hall, sending a newspaper clipping or an email are just a few of the many ways individuals can advocate from their own home.

In today’s world elected officials and regular individuals alike are bombarded with messages, from advertisements on the bus to a long social media newsfeed, all the way to robotic phone calls and junk mail. It’s important that we take a step back to cut through the noise to deliver our advocacy message to state and federal decision makers: Home care is important to me, and it should be important to you too.

For more information on how you, your colleagues, or your clients can share your voice in advocacy, please email advocacy@bayada.com or sign up to join Hearts for Home Care today!