New Year, New Home Care Wishes for 2022

2021 has been an incredible year for home care advocates, who continued to discover that meeting with legislators and sharing their personal home care stories did not have to occur in-person only. Embracing an increasingly digital world has been an advantage to many home care clients, caregivers, and families who are home-bound or have mobility issues—or are just plain too busy to be able to travel to and from legislative meetings.

Additionally, in the second year of COVID, many state and federal decision makers started to truly understand why home care makes sense: It keeps vulnerable individuals at home and out of potentially-infectious institutions, and it saves Medicaid programs money by doing so. 2021 was filled with many legislative accomplishments in which lawmakers opted to increase funding for home care programs in light of the ever-persistent challenges home care clients and families continue to face—primarily the difficulty in accessing home care when there is still—despite increasing funding—a workforce shortage.

In-home nurses, home health aides, and other caregivers are the backbone of the home health care industry. Home care would not be possible without these compassionate heroes that help families stay together. And while 2021 was filled with accomplishments, two advocates share their New Year’s hopes and show us why we all must recommit ourselves to home health care advocacy in 2022.

Below, see what home care client Ari A. of North Carolina, and home care mom Jill P. shared with us regarding the challenges they still face, and what they hope to see in the New Year.

Ari A. – Home care client in North Carolina

Ari with nurse Katrina Clagg, LPN.

I can’t tell you how much of a God-send it was to recently learn the fantastic news. NC Governor Cooper signed a budget that raised the Medicaid reimbursement for Private Duty Nursing (PDN) by 13.6%! I know so many people, including myself, who have been struggling to get their shifts covered because of low pay. These struggles go back several years, even before the pandemic. COVID -19 just made the staffing crisis in home care more visible to the public. I’m glad it did. It meant that the NC legislature could see more clearly the dire need, and they acted. Talk about seizing the moment! For this, the NC General Assembly will forever have my gratitude. 

Now that PDN can be more competitive with higher pay, hopefully nurses in other fields will see why we love home care. We love it because it is a protective shield that protects patients like me from the harm that can happen to us each and every day. Just last week my airway became totally blocked all of the sudden. Once again, one of my nurses saved my life. She acted professionally and calmly as she quickly fixed the problem. I wouldn’t have gotten such a fast response anywhere else other than one-on-one care at home. Without it, I certainly would have died. 

Home care to me also means love. I get to spend my life at home, sharing the love of my family, instead of being stuck in a medical facility, or not alive at all. It’s the best Christmas gift that keeps on giving all year round! 

So for all you working in the hospital or as a travel nurse, I have great hopes for 2022. Home care overall is fast becoming the new front line of medical care. More and more people that need complex care are coming home from the hospital and we need you! Simply put, taking care of people in their own home is the best way to advance your skills and help vital members of the community as well. Chronically ill patients like me are ready to welcome you into our homes with open arms. You will find that it is one of the greatest gifts you will receive! 

With Much Thankfulness, 

Aaron “Ari” Anderson 

Jill P. – Maryland mother of home care client Nadiya

Nadiya (front) is able to spend the holidays at home with mom Jill and her family

Nadiya shares a smile in her MD home.

Our 17 year old daughter Nadiya has life threatening seizures and multiple complex disabilities caused by a rare genic disease. She relies on night nursing to keep her safe. It is essential but for the last several weeks we have had only 2 of our 7 nights covered.

It is difficult to find capable, reliable nurses who have the skills to manage complex unpredictable seizures and assist with her activities of daily life. Because we live close to DC, many good nurses choose to work in DC where they can make more money through higher Medicaid reimbursement rates.

My child’s future health and safety as she transitions into adulthood, is reliant on home care. This is a great concern for our family. The pandemic has made this already complicated problem much worse. For 2022, I hope that more state and federal lawmakers continue to see how impactful home care is for families. I hope that more families become involved in advocacy and share their stories so that there is a groundswell for better wages and incentives for these frontline workers.

Home care nurses are an essential support that need to be valued and compensated competitively for their important work. Until that changes Nadiya’s future care is not secure. 

Jill Pelovitz

Parent, Caregiver, and Passionate Advocate

Home Care and Independence

Lee-Ann Quinn with son Zach. (PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO)

My name is Zach Quinn and in many ways, I’m similar to other 22-year-olds that are around me: I love board games, video games, and movies. I love my family—even though my three little sisters get on my nerves sometimes. 

But I’m very different from just about every other 22-year-old I know in one big way:  I have Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), and I rely on home health care services for nearly all of my daily activities. These nursing and certified nursing assistant (CNA) services allow me to be as independent as possible—and allow me to live, in many ways, like my non-medically complex peers. 

DMD is a degenerative neuro-muscular disease that causes the muscles in the body to weaken. DMD led to the loss of my ability to walk, and my needing a wheelchair. It has also led to the loss of lung function, which required me getting a trach and vent to breathe for me. I need to be medically monitored to stay independent, which is why I rely on home care in my daily life.

I wanted to write this blog post as a way to show the wider world that being disabled doesn’t make me—and others like me—so different, as long as we have the proper care in place. Home care allows me to maintain my independence. It takes a lot for me to do that, but it is worth it. I need nurses and CNAs to get ready every day. They help me get washed and dressed so I can get up in my wheelchair and start my day without my parents’ help. This makes it so I can hang out with my family, go out in my community, and be myself. I appreciate the life I have because of the care I receive from my nurses and CNAs, and it has changed my life.

Zach with his siblings and home care nurse, Jeff.

I truly believe that home care is the future of healthcare, and that so many more people could benefit from it if it was more readily accessible. Home care keeps disabled adults and seniors out of nursing homes and other facilities, and it keeps medically-complex children and adults like me independent in our communities. From a wider scope, this allows many people to grow up at home, go to school, contribute to the economy, and contribute to the community. Also, by keeping people out of costly places like ERs, hospitals, and long-term rehab and nursing facilities, it saves state budgets’ and families’ money. 

I truly believe that home care is the future of healthcare, and that so many more people could benefit from it if it was more readily accessible.

Another purpose of this blog post is to show what happens when things fall through. There is a huge gap in people’s ability to access home care, even if they and their families prefer to be at home. I’m no exception. I have had great nurses and CNAs leave the home care industry, which has led to my parents having to call out of work. They usually leave for better paying jobs—which is great for them, and often necessary so that they can support their own families. But it really affects me—it makes my care unpredictable for me and my parents, and makes it more difficult for them to count on care and know that they can sleep and work normally.

It also makes it a “revolving door” of caregivers in many ways. This has its own layer of problems, but in the end, the best way to prevent this is to ensure that caregivers like nurses and CNAs can make a sustainable wage and living in home care.  I studied Digital Media in high school, and I wanted to pursue a career in video game design. There are so many individuals in RI and across the US and the world who are able to live good lives, get jobs, and provide to the economy and community as long as good home care coverage is available. I don’t belong in a nursing home—I belong in my own home, and in a place where I can design video games!

Zach and family with Rep. Julie Casimiro during a home visit a few years ago.

But I can’t accomplish any of this without home care. We need to make sure that enough people want to work in home care—that it is a rewarding and compassionate career path. In my home state of Rhode Island, and in nearly every other state in the US, professional caregivers like nurses, CNAs, and home health aides are paid less than their counterparts in other settings—like hospitals. This keeps institutional care as more readily accessible to people who need long-term support. The federal government and state legislators must make sure that home care is a viable career by funding home care programs better. This would allow nurses, aides, and other caregivers to be paid a fairer wage—and would allow more of the workforce to enter home care. 

There will be a long time before we can say that home care is as accessible as care in other places. But this is one way to start.

After all, isn’t celebrating individual independence a huge and important part of our collective American culture?

Home Health Aides’ Low Wages: Turning Public Awareness into Action

Home health aides keep hundreds of thousands of disabled adults and seniors at home and out of costlier settings. Low Medicaid reimbursement rates keep them from making a better wage, and it's up to state governments to address this issue.
Home health aides keep hundreds of thousands of disabled adults and seniors at home and out of costlier settings.

As home care clients, employees, caregivers, and family members, we know one thing for a fact: Home health aides do incredible, compassionate work that enable hundreds of thousands of residents across the country to stay at home and out of costlier, more infectious settings like nursing homes and hospitals. And we certainly know another fact: The work that aides do is invaluable, and it’s time that they begin to receive a fair wage for the hard work they do.

Low aide wages have recently made national headlines and the message is clear: We will need more and more home health aides as America’s population continues to age. But home health care providers are having trouble recruiting and retaining the quality, reliable workforce needed to keep up with the growing demand.

Recently, Hearts for Home Care advocate and BAYADA Home Health Care’s chief government affairs officer, Dave Totaro, submitted his opinion on the matter to STAT News, a media company focused on finding and telling compelling stories about health, medicine, and scientific discovery. He posed the question:

“To say that home health aides’ work is demanding is an understatement. They make it possible for 14 million Americans to stay in their homes and out of expensive and impersonal institutional settings like hospitals and nursing homes. Performing this necessary and in-demand work takes a physical and emotional toll, yet these individuals do it with compassion day in and day out.

So why do we treat home health aides as low-wage, low-value workers?”

The problem lies primarily in states’ low Medicaid funding for home care programs. Though states typically pay an hourly rate for providers who deliver home health aide services, these rates have largely been low for many years, or raised periodically, but at a rate too low to keep up with real costs of living and providing services. Because these rates must cover wages, training, benefits, new hire costs such as background checks and TB shots, and supplies, it is nearly impossible for home health care companies to take such a low rate and provide aides with a wage high enough to compete with industries like fast food and retail.

News coverage of the issue has been effective in bringing greater public awareness to the issue, especially as nearly all individuals will be touched by home care at least once in their lives, whether it be for themselves, a parent, friend, or other loved one. Now is the time to take awareness and turn it into action. Call your state legislator and let them know what home care means to you. Contact advocacy@bayada.com for information on what you can do to share your voice and support home health aides.