New Year, New Home Care Wishes for 2022

2021 has been an incredible year for home care advocates, who continued to discover that meeting with legislators and sharing their personal home care stories did not have to occur in-person only. Embracing an increasingly digital world has been an advantage to many home care clients, caregivers, and families who are home-bound or have mobility issues—or are just plain too busy to be able to travel to and from legislative meetings.

Additionally, in the second year of COVID, many state and federal decision makers started to truly understand why home care makes sense: It keeps vulnerable individuals at home and out of potentially-infectious institutions, and it saves Medicaid programs money by doing so. 2021 was filled with many legislative accomplishments in which lawmakers opted to increase funding for home care programs in light of the ever-persistent challenges home care clients and families continue to face—primarily the difficulty in accessing home care when there is still—despite increasing funding—a workforce shortage.

In-home nurses, home health aides, and other caregivers are the backbone of the home health care industry. Home care would not be possible without these compassionate heroes that help families stay together. And while 2021 was filled with accomplishments, two advocates share their New Year’s hopes and show us why we all must recommit ourselves to home health care advocacy in 2022.

Below, see what home care client Ari A. of North Carolina, and home care mom Jill P. shared with us regarding the challenges they still face, and what they hope to see in the New Year.

Ari A. – Home care client in North Carolina

Ari with nurse Katrina Clagg, LPN.

I can’t tell you how much of a God-send it was to recently learn the fantastic news. NC Governor Cooper signed a budget that raised the Medicaid reimbursement for Private Duty Nursing (PDN) by 13.6%! I know so many people, including myself, who have been struggling to get their shifts covered because of low pay. These struggles go back several years, even before the pandemic. COVID -19 just made the staffing crisis in home care more visible to the public. I’m glad it did. It meant that the NC legislature could see more clearly the dire need, and they acted. Talk about seizing the moment! For this, the NC General Assembly will forever have my gratitude. 

Now that PDN can be more competitive with higher pay, hopefully nurses in other fields will see why we love home care. We love it because it is a protective shield that protects patients like me from the harm that can happen to us each and every day. Just last week my airway became totally blocked all of the sudden. Once again, one of my nurses saved my life. She acted professionally and calmly as she quickly fixed the problem. I wouldn’t have gotten such a fast response anywhere else other than one-on-one care at home. Without it, I certainly would have died. 

Home care to me also means love. I get to spend my life at home, sharing the love of my family, instead of being stuck in a medical facility, or not alive at all. It’s the best Christmas gift that keeps on giving all year round! 

So for all you working in the hospital or as a travel nurse, I have great hopes for 2022. Home care overall is fast becoming the new front line of medical care. More and more people that need complex care are coming home from the hospital and we need you! Simply put, taking care of people in their own home is the best way to advance your skills and help vital members of the community as well. Chronically ill patients like me are ready to welcome you into our homes with open arms. You will find that it is one of the greatest gifts you will receive! 

With Much Thankfulness, 

Aaron “Ari” Anderson 

Jill P. – Maryland mother of home care client Nadiya

Nadiya (front) is able to spend the holidays at home with mom Jill and her family

Nadiya shares a smile in her MD home.

Our 17 year old daughter Nadiya has life threatening seizures and multiple complex disabilities caused by a rare genic disease. She relies on night nursing to keep her safe. It is essential but for the last several weeks we have had only 2 of our 7 nights covered.

It is difficult to find capable, reliable nurses who have the skills to manage complex unpredictable seizures and assist with her activities of daily life. Because we live close to DC, many good nurses choose to work in DC where they can make more money through higher Medicaid reimbursement rates.

My child’s future health and safety as she transitions into adulthood, is reliant on home care. This is a great concern for our family. The pandemic has made this already complicated problem much worse. For 2022, I hope that more state and federal lawmakers continue to see how impactful home care is for families. I hope that more families become involved in advocacy and share their stories so that there is a groundswell for better wages and incentives for these frontline workers.

Home care nurses are an essential support that need to be valued and compensated competitively for their important work. Until that changes Nadiya’s future care is not secure. 

Jill Pelovitz

Parent, Caregiver, and Passionate Advocate

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