Delaware Session Wraps Up


Shannon Gahs, Patty Watson, and Ali Knott met with Rep. David Bentz (top right) to thank him for his support of home health care

The Delaware General Assembly typically closes late into the evening on its June 30 deadline, giving the last day of session extra drama, a party for winners and a night of stomach-wrenching stress for those hoping for a last-minute miracle. Typically what keeps them in session is debate over the state’s annual budget. This year, the budget process was different in two ways- first, the state had a surplus of funds because of changes to the federal tax code; second, the budget passed with three days to spare. Most of the $20 million in unexpected funds went to long-overdue pay raises for state employees and teachers. The legislature also passed paid parental leave for state employees, filled open state positions that investigate child abuse and neglect and that staff juvenile detention facilities, and shored up programs that benefit those with intellectual and developmental disabilities and that improve reading and special education. Much of the public debate in Dover this year was around gun rights and legalizing marijuana.

This year, we asked the legislature for a 21 percent increase in the RN and LPN home care reimbursement rates, an ask that would cost the state about $3.1 million annually. BAYADA Delaware leaders and our Hearts for Home Care Ambassadors educated and advocated by giving testimony at a Joint Finance Committee hearing, meeting with legislators and being active on social media campaigns. The legislature, with the stated intent of being economically frugal and with an eye on whether they were constraining future legislatures by increasing recurring expenses, looked more favorably on one-time expenses and grants this year. We did not get the increase. We did, however, build support with many legislators. At the end of session, five legislators committed to meet together in the fall to determine strategy for how to improve rates for nurses who are currently reimbursed at the same levels as they were 13 years ago.

The end of June saw the ends of legislative careers for more than 25 percent of the legislature through retirements and public intentions not to run for re-election. Primary Day for Delaware is September 6. The general election is November 6, 2018. All 41 seats in the House and half of the Senate are on the ballot this year. To learn more about your ballot, your polling place, and other voter information, click here. If you have any questions about this session or our legislative priorities for Delaware, don’t hesitate to reach out to me.

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